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#1 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 05:14 PM

I'm shooting a film test on this stock on Thursday.

It is a 64D film but because it's black and white does it matter if i use tungsten balanced lights without the filter?

Is there a specific filter for use with correcting colour temperatures on B/W film?

Edited by Jamie McIntyre, 20 May 2007 - 05:16 PM.

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#2 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 05:23 PM

Nevermind. It is 64T.

My mistake.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 05:33 PM

It's not really tungsten or daylight in balance, being a panchromatic b&w stock -- it's just a third of a stop more sensitive at the 5500K end of the color spectrum than the 3200K end. Which is something to consider when using red-to-orange filters (to change contrast outdoors), that the film sensitivity starts to drop as the light gets redder due to filtering.
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#4 Matthew Buick

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 05:59 PM

I thought it was orthochromatic that couldn't handle reds... :huh:
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#5 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 06:15 PM

Excuse my ignorance, what do panchromatic and orthochromatic mean?
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#6 Matthew Buick

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 06:53 PM

Panchromatic film stock is sensitive to all colours of the spectrum. Yet orthocromatic is only sensitive to greens and blues, with almost no sensitivity to yellows, oranges, and reds. :)
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 07:19 PM

In the early days of film, the stock was only sensitive to blue. So eventually they increased the sensitivity to green as well and called it "ortho" (Greek origin, for "correct", "straight", "right").

But that wasn't "correct" enough for people, especially those using the early two-color processes who needed some red sensitivity (red wavelengths have less energy than blue ones.) Most silent era movies were shot on ortho stock, hence the white-ish skies (blue tended to overexpose and a red filter wouldn't work) and the need to paint faces with white-ish make-up with brown lipstick to get a good tonal range on the face. With a red-insensitive stock, reds in fleshtones could go very dark (underexposed) and blue eyes could go white-ish.

So "panchromatic" b&w stock was invented, sensitive to "all" ("pan") colors, though still a little more sensitive to blues than reds.

You'll notice in lab stocks that there are still some blue-sensitive only and orthochromatic stocks being made.
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#8 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 08:42 PM

Im shooting this stock tmo with a 5.6 key.

What is a good ASA to rate this stock at?

I was told the normal ASA for this doesn't really work very well.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 May 2007 - 12:58 AM

Im shooting this stock tmo with a 5.6 key.

What is a good ASA to rate this stock at?

I was told the normal ASA for this doesn't really work very well.


The normal ASA rating should work fine (but ideally you'd shoot a test to see how your lab is processing it because you may want to change your ASA rating to compensate). But you have to be a little more creative in thinking about exposure with b&w -- it's all about the tonal reproduction. For example, Kaminski discovered while shooting "Schindler's List" that he preferred caucasian faces to be exposed for a lighter grey tone, which mean overexposing them a half-stop to one stop on average.
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