Jump to content


Photo

lighting question


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Julia Gers

Julia Gers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • P.A.
  • STL, MO

Posted 21 May 2007 - 01:57 PM

This thursday I'm going to do some work (for free <_< ...but tis ok) at a shoot at the zoo here. The zoo has a 3D dinosaur film running in it's main building and they want a two minute intro to the movie. We will be filming some in the herpetarium (aka: reptile house) and will also be filming the director of the zoo talking about how reptiles are descendants of dinosaurs. We need a zoo feel to it so we're sticking him in front of where the flamingos are. The thing is, there is this overhang over where he'll be and we're filming facing the flamingos. I was told that they were probably just going to stick a light right in front of his face because that was the only way to get good lighting under the overhang and with lots of backlight. But when I heard this I just had an image in my head of some guy squinting because the sun was glaring in his eyes. On a shoot, if you put a bright light 3 or 4 feet in front of someone's face won't it make them squint and won't they most likely not like a bright light in their face? Does anyone have any better solutions than this?
  • 0

#2 Bart Miller

Bart Miller

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 21 May 2007 - 02:01 PM

You can either reflect it off a foam core or put a silk in front of it. These are just two ways... there are many others. You might want to also try a large bank soft light. Those are usually less direct than fresnels or open faced lights.
  • 0

#3 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3066 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 21 May 2007 - 03:00 PM

You can soften the light with silks or some kind of diffusion like 216. Placing the light off to one side of camera will generally yield a more pleasing result, as it will allow some modelling of his features.

Slightly unrelated to your question, but relevant I think - if he's talking about reptiles, why are you shooting him in front of flamingos?
  • 0

#4 Rick Sharf

Rick Sharf
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Student

Posted 21 May 2007 - 04:44 PM

well just sticking a light in front of him might not be the best idea for lighting an interview. The overhang can actually be beneficial for you because you can control the light on his face. Do you have to shoot with the flamingos in the background? it might make more sense if there is something relating to the theme in the background rather than just zoo stuff.

for lighting the interviewee a baby and a 4x silk hitting him from an angle might work out well for you
  • 0

#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 21 May 2007 - 06:07 PM

Well, if there's a budget (and electrical capabilities) for a high-powered HMI or two, that'd be a good option. That way you can at least position the light far enough away to not be a huge distraction for the director's potentially squinting eyes.

Otherwise, you should be able to get some light in there by rigging up some reflectors. Just shoot at a time of day when the sun is mostly backlighting the flamingos in the background so the frontal view of the flamingos is closer to the light level of the director.

Ummm, one more thing. Why are you shooting him with flamingos if he's going to be speaking about reptiles?
  • 0

#6 Julia Gers

Julia Gers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • P.A.
  • STL, MO

Posted 23 May 2007 - 12:40 PM

I was just glancing over the script today (I didn't actually read it enough...just glanced over it...but it was with the shooting schedual) and it looks like he's not talking entirely about reptiles. He's still connecting animals living today to dinosaurs. I thought we would be filming in the reptile house and was really excited because snakes are my favorite animals, but looking at schedual, it looks like we really aren't filming there :( ahwell.
Thanks for all the lighting options guys :lol: I'm going to read over it again later today too. I think they were origionally going to put a backdrop or something behind him (to bounce the light off? ...something like that) but they thought that it needed to look more like he was at the zoo. My mom suggested sound effects lol...I don't know what they'll do...I think just sticking with the flamingos.
  • 0

#7 Julia Gers

Julia Gers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • P.A.
  • STL, MO

Posted 24 May 2007 - 06:53 PM

We used an HMI light and a reflector. The light wasn't too close, and we actually weren't under an overhang. It worked alright, except we kept having to find a new spot for the reflector and the sun kept changing because there would be lots of clouds, then not many, then overcast, then not. There was also some dappled light from nearby bushes and trees and stuff. At one point the electric where we had the HMI plugged in blew and we had to call the zoo's electrician. But it ended up all ok in the end.
  • 0

#8 Ralph Keyser

Ralph Keyser
  • Sustaining Members
  • 120 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 25 May 2007 - 11:10 AM

...we kept having to find a new spot for the reflector and the sun kept changing because there would be lots of clouds, then not many, then overcast, then not...


That darn sun just won't hold still :D It's one of the challenges of day exteriors.
Thanks for posting a followup to let us know how it came out!
  • 0

#9 Julia Gers

Julia Gers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • P.A.
  • STL, MO

Posted 25 May 2007 - 12:15 PM

That darn sun just won't hold still :D It's one of the challenges of day exteriors.
Thanks for posting a followup to let us know how it came out!


I dunno when it'll be up with the feature movie. I'm thinking it'll be soon. (I think they were going to edit it and finish the post production of it by monday...maybe...) I'll ask my dad.
  • 0


Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Opal

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport