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#1 Joseph Zizzo

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 12:00 PM

i have been a big fan of fuji since reala came out, but i haven't had the opportunity to use the new eterna 160 yet. any experiences out there?

i'm excited because it claims to have a contrast level i've mised at times, what with the eternas and vision 2 and the incredible shadow detail that those newer stocks give us. which i love, but some situations call for a bit more contrast. the fuji 64D is good in that regard, too.
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#2 Richardson Leao

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Posted 25 May 2007 - 03:37 AM

i have been a big fan of fuji since reala came out, but i haven't had the opportunity to use the new eterna 160 yet. any experiences out there?

i'm excited because it claims to have a contrast level i've mised at times, what with the eternas and vision 2 and the incredible shadow detail that those newer stocks give us. which i love, but some situations call for a bit more contrast. the fuji 64D is good in that regard, too.



it's still not available in australia
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#3 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 28 May 2007 - 08:10 AM

Just shot it on 16mm. Loved the colours and contrast, but I thought it was a tad bit grainy, perhaps. Nothing earth-shattering, just as a note. I will post the video as soon as I've got it.
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#4 Joseph Zizzo

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Posted 28 May 2007 - 10:29 PM

grainy? that's surprising, for a slower film... but maybe that's intentional. its tough to get grain nowadays.

i like the grain of the reala, when a little texture is called for. i mean, why else shoot film?
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#5 Mike Williamson

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 03:57 AM

Looking forwards to seeing the video or stills, Adam, what project was it for? Can you tell us how you rated the stock and if you supervised the transfer? Love the website by the way, lots of great work.
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#6 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 05:55 PM

Thanks.

I have the video, but since it's not officially released I can't post it yet (don't know if I will put on the website anyhow - it's a skimpy dance number that isn't directly subtle). But I will try to
link to it temporarily. I rated it at 125ASA (or maybe 100ASA - can't remember). It was shot on 16mm aiming for a 4x3 release, which increased magnification slightly. Very pastel, primal colours - blues and pinks. We went for a pretty pushed Technicolor look.

I will include some tiny frame grabs for the time being.

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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 06:13 PM

Reminds me of a dream I once had...

How come my shoots are never as interesting as that???

Everything looks great, especially considering it's 16mm.
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#8 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 06:30 PM

Reminds me of a dream I once had...

How come my shoots are never as interesting as that???

Maybe because you don't shoot music videos?
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#9 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 07:57 PM

Thanks.

As a side note - the director wanted no shadows and still have that double rim going on. Which is easy-peasy to do in close-ups, but slightly harder to do in wides. Especially when you're shooting in the smallest studio in London and the models are 3ft away from the cyc and the wall...

Anyway, I'm getting really fastidious with my soft lights. I completely understand why Lubezki and other go through such elaborate pains to make soft lights. The fact is that making a true soft light of a considerable size is a monstruos task. Here I went for 4 10K's bounced into two huge white solid butterflys (20x20ft's) on either side of the camera and a 10K in a Chimera above it. Mayhem - got shadows from each single source. Not so much from the Chimera or from direct spill - every lamp in the bounce, even though flagged off so as not to give direct light - created its own shadow. Total nightmare. In the end we kind of had to go just go with it.

Bouncing is also extremely power inefficient and I can't help to think that there must be a better way. Briese's are the answer, but with a hefty rental price they're often out of reach (although they save that in in manpower and time, easily - but producers only see the price) on many music videos. BTW, just shot with the huge 330 the other day - 10ft across! Great light.

I wish someone would build me this: A frame 20x20ft completely filled with 40W household bulbs with a silk in front of it and eggcrates. All on a dimmer. All easily transportable (foldable?) and where you don't have to take the bulbs out for transport. That's what I want. And I want it now. :ph34r:
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#10 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 08:12 PM

I wish someone would build me this: A frame 20x20ft completely filled with 40W household bulbs with a silk in front of it and eggcrates. All on a dimmer. All easily transportable (foldable?) and where you don't have to take the bulbs out for transport. That's what I want. And I want it now. :ph34r:


Sort of the Kubrick/Alcott method of creating softlight -- multiple bulbs through a diffuser. They used hundreds of PAR's going through a giant welded frame of diffusion for "The Shining" sets to create soft winter light. They used hundreds of mushroom globes under the Perspex floor in the end of in "2001" and I think hundreds of photofloods or mushroom globes (with no diffuser) above the Africa set for a soft dusk effect.
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#11 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 11:17 PM

Thanks.

I have the video, but since it's not officially released I can't post it yet (don't know if I will put on the website anyhow - it's a skimpy dance number that isn't directly subtle). But I will try to
link to it temporarily. I rated it at 125ASA (or maybe 100ASA - can't remember). It was shot on 16mm aiming for a 4x3 release, which increased magnification slightly. Very pastel, primal colours - blues and pinks. We went for a pretty pushed Technicolor look.

I will include some tiny frame grabs for the time being.


If I get a vote, I vote you make it a permanent addition to your website, Whoa! :blink: BTW, I just bookmarked your website in antisapation and I'm sure I'm not the only one Oh, and did I mention, Whoa!!!

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 29 May 2007 - 11:22 PM.

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