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9 fps ??


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#1 Chris Burke

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 07:02 PM

If I shoot at 9 fps, then have my footage tranfered at that speed, will the resulting footage play back at normal speed, but be rather choppy? I am shooting Super 8 and may want to have a skinny shutter look. My camera does not have a manual adjustable shutter angle, so I would like to achieve some sort of staccato look.

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#2 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 07:19 PM

If I shoot at 9 fps, then have my footage tranfered at that speed, will the resulting footage play back at normal speed, but be rather choppy? I am shooting Super 8 and may want to have a skinny shutter look. My camera does not have a manual adjustable shutter angle, so I would like to achieve some sort of staccato look.

chris


It should work for you. I have done it. The trick is a telecine service that will transfer at 9fps, as it's not that common, but maybe you have that part worked out. Is the look exactly what you want? Not sure. You have to try it.
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#3 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 02:59 AM

If I shoot at 9 fps, then have my footage tranfered at that speed, will the resulting footage play back at normal speed, but be rather choppy? I am shooting Super 8 and may want to have a skinny shutter look. My camera does not have a manual adjustable shutter angle, so I would like to achieve some sort of staccato look.

chris


6 frames per second, all the way up to 9 frames per second, should work fine for the technique you want to do.
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#4 Chris Burke

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 06:30 AM

6 frames per second, all the way up to 9 frames per second, should work fine for the technique you want to do.



thank for the info. I will post results of our test, here.


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#5 Don Brown

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 06:56 AM

[quote name='Chris Burke' date='May 27 2007, 01:02 AM' post='175072']
If I shoot at 9 fps, then have my footage tranfered at that speed, will the resulting footage play back at normal speed, but be rather choppy? I am shooting Super 8 and may want to have a skinny shutter look. My camera does not have a manual adjustable shutter angle, so I would like to achieve some sort of staccato look.

Hi Chris
Is this the effect you are after

http://rondexter.com...-speed_blur.htm

I was working on a car commercial in France where we did this and some shots on the film "Wimbledon" they said it was poor mans (Time- Slice)

Regards

Don
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#6 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 01:19 PM

thank for the info. I will post results of our test, here.
chris


Don's contribution reminds me to point out that the slower filming speeds will have slower shutter speeds which makes the effect somewhat different from a straight 90 degree shutter effect as it will have more motion blur within the frame. However, the slower frame rate that is then transferred at the identical frame rate it was shot at is still a cool effect with many applications.

On some super-8 cameras you may also be able to keep the shutter speed set to a faster rate even as you reduced the frames per second speed by keeping the actual filming speed dial at 24FPS. You may find that you get multiple shutter speed options if the camera allows for you to set the filming speed rate as a separate function that does not get overridden when you switch to intervalometer mode.

How can you tell? Well, while the intervalometer is running at a few frames per second switch the filming speed from 18 frames per second to 24 frames per second and see if you hear the "pitch" become faster for each and every frame that is being exposed. You may find you can set the shutter speed by setting the frames per second to 24, 18, 9 (if the camera has the 9FPS speed) and single frame modes and that these all have different shutter speeds which on some cameras will remain in effect even when switching to the intervalometer mode. This is a very cool option that is very hard to find on 16mm or 35mm cameras.
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#7 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 01:52 PM

I agree with Alex. Lower frame rates on most S8 cameras have longer exposure per frame, and more motion blur. Which is the opposite of the staccato effect... 90 or 45 degree shutter with sharp, stroby images.
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#8 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 04:11 PM

It should work for you. I have done it. The trick is a telecine service that will transfer at 9fps, as it's not that common, but maybe you have that part worked out. Is the look exactly what you want? Not sure. You have to try it.
Rick



Any Rank with a metaspeed will be able to run at 9fps, we routinely transfer at 5fps for one client and the machine is capable of transfer of film at any speed between 1fps and 40fps with no real issues. Other Telecine's like the Spirit can do the same.

I just shot a 10min little super8 film on 500t and shot much of it undercranked, anywhere from firing off single frames by hand to setting my Bauer's intervalometer and ramping fastest speed was 18fps, and then transfered at 18fps to disk. I speed changed the video to between 40% and 60% of it's original video speed. I have some really nice looking flash frame looking stop motion out of this one. I would suggest a slow speed transfer and some combo of that and post manipulation for this look.

-Rob-
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