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EASTMAN Double-X 7222


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#1 Merlyn Haycraft

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 08:39 PM

Hi!

I am a week away from shooting a Super 16MM film and I am still procrastinating as to film stock. The film is shot all at night and the director wants black and white. However I am worried that Double-X is not fast enough.

I have thought about pushing it two stops but having seen it normally, it already looks grainy as can be, and I don't want too much of that effect!

So my dilemma is, do I stick with the Double-X and push it two stops, or film in 500T and go to black and white in the Telecine!?

Any insight would be much appreciated, and also as to which colour film stock to go for. I'd like a fairly sharp image with high contrast.

Thanks! :) :)
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#2 Dan Goulder

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 09:01 PM

As much as I prefer using black and white negative for a b & w finish, if it looks like you're going to be two stops short, it would probably be best to use 500T color negative for this particular shoot.
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#3 Richardson Leao

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 11:57 PM

You could give the N74 Orwo a go?!

http://www.filmotec....4_e/n_74_e.html

that is iso 400

And quite pretty

cheers

richardson


Hi!

I am a week away from shooting a Super 16MM film and I am still procrastinating as to film stock. The film is shot all at night and the director wants black and white. However I am worried that Double-X is not fast enough.

I have thought about pushing it two stops but having seen it normally, it already looks grainy as can be, and I don't want too much of that effect!

So my dilemma is, do I stick with the Double-X and push it two stops, or film in 500T and go to black and white in the Telecine!?

Any insight would be much appreciated, and also as to which colour film stock to go for. I'd like a fairly sharp image with high contrast.

Thanks! :) :)


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#4 Merlyn Haycraft

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Posted 28 May 2007 - 02:52 AM

Thank you both. I'll take both into consideration
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#5 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 28 May 2007 - 03:28 AM

"I'd like a fairly sharp image with high contrast."

Bear in mind that fast films are usually lower in contrast. However, pushing any film will increase the contrast and this can make the images appear slightly sharper than they really are. Though there is also an increase in grain.

Edited by Patrick Cooper, 28 May 2007 - 03:29 AM.

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#6 Merlyn Haycraft

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Posted 28 May 2007 - 07:06 AM

One more question concerning the tele cine. How exactly does it work, the process I mean? Does the telecine supervisor simply completely desaturate the image or should I be asking for something else?
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 28 May 2007 - 10:55 AM

They will lay down a b&w signal to tape -- the only twist is whether you want to play with the contrast while the image is in color first before converting it to b&w, because doing this gives you more control. It's a little like using color filters in b&w photography. If you correct the image in color first, you can darken a blue sky separately than a face, let's say, before you switch it to b&w. Less of an issue for interior photography.
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Paralinx LLC