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Video Assist


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#1 David Regan

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 10:41 AM

I just got my first work on a 35mm feature in a couple weeks, and I talked to the first AC who said I would be doing a lot of video assist stuff, in addition to whatever other help they needed. They are using an Arricam Lite and Studio. I was just wondering if there was any 'Set-Etiquette' in regards to video assist that I should be aware of, like things to never do, or things I should always watch for.
Thanks
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 11:49 AM

I just got my first work on a 35mm feature in a couple weeks, and I talked to the first AC who said I would be doing a lot of video assist stuff, in addition to whatever other help they needed. They are using an Arricam Lite and Studio. I was just wondering if there was any 'Set-Etiquette' in regards to video assist that I should be aware of, like things to never do, or things I should always watch for.
Thanks


Make sure cables are never obtrusive and neatly kept/coiled. Put the monitor in a nice place out of the way, but close to the action as quickly as possible for each setup. If it's bright around the monitor keep the hood on it. It's a pretty simple job.
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#3 timHealy

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 09:43 PM

Ask them if they can get a monitor that will run off 120 volts AC and 12 volts DC. It can be a pain if you hear them screaming for the monitor and you have to wait for the electricians to run cable. Make yourself self sufficient. You can run off batteries for a while until power is run out.

Best

Tim
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#4 Rob van Gelder

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 10:27 PM

As I know it, and I have seen, done and still arrange video assist systems from the very early Arri 3 with fixed door/eyepiece and tube-assist until the newest Arricam assists, is is hardly something that you can do next to the normal things you do as a second assistant.
Specially if you have 2 camera's or more it is in my opinion a full time job, and the moment you have no picture available because you are loading or cleaning filters or whatever, you'll hear the director (and others) scream why they have no live picture!

Video assist, if done properly, is NOT a easy job anymore, directors, AD's and more have become so addicted to the little monitor, in many cases only directing behind the monitor and not "en face" with their actors that you cannot afford to let them wait.

Try to find out how much the video is really needed, if it is essential to key people then you should push for an proper video assist man or another assistant to take care of cables etc.
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#5 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 30 May 2007 - 10:40 AM

As I know it, and I have seen, done and still arrange video assist systems from the very early Arri 3 with fixed door/eyepiece and tube-assist until the newest Arricam assists, is is hardly something that you can do next to the normal things you do as a second assistant.
Specially if you have 2 camera's or more it is in my opinion a full time job, and the moment you have no picture available because you are loading or cleaning filters or whatever, you'll hear the director (and others) scream why they have no live picture!

I think things are a bit different over here than where you are Rob. First of all, it's very common for the 2nd to move the monitors around on features here. If there are two cameras there are two 2nd's, so one can help cover the other when one is busy with the monitors. Second, the 2nd won't be loading, the loader will, so that's one less thing to worry about.

David,
Dealing with video shouldn't be that big an issue. I'm sure you'll get used to how everyone works very quickly and you'll do fine. One suggestion I would make is to always make sure there is a picture on the monitors before walking away to do other things. It sounds simple, but it's easy for something small to happen without you noticing.
Good luck.
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#6 David Regan

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Posted 30 May 2007 - 04:53 PM

Thanks for all the help guys. I'll keep all that stuff in mind when I get to set. Much appreciated.
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