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Goodbye Film! Goodbye HD! Hello Super Hi-Vision


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#1 Evan Winter

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 11:00 PM

Here's an interesting development:

http://www.pcworld.c...tv/article.html

Engineers in Japan have developed a system they call Super Hi-Vision which uses a resolution of 4,320 x 7,680. They even managed to build a prototype sensor to capture at such insane resos.

Not bad but I can't wait for the next generation - Super Awesome Extreme Hi-Vision.

Evan
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#2 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 11:57 PM

Well, let's just wait and see what it ACTUALLY does before, we start dressing in black, dropping our Arris, Kinors and Panavisions into an oblong box in preperation to hoist it 6 feet down and cover it with earth, shall we? B) But that is pretty cool.
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#3 Xavier Plaza

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Posted 30 May 2007 - 12:04 AM

wow that's sound awesome !!!! i wanna see that...


But in other way, i always think since the DV, HDV revolution begin it's more trustworthy and secure go in the traditional way (film), Goodbye film i don't think so, i hear that so many times... <_< , i wanna be like film thats sound better... :lol:
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 30 May 2007 - 06:05 AM

Hi,

They've been showing it since NAB last year. It is, predictably, pretty impressive in terms of resolution. Unfortunately the demo footage they've got isn't particularly fantastic - rather clippy and videoish and I suspect that's more to do with the camerawork than the technology, from the look of it.

Much of it seems to have been shot around Tokyo or something and it looks like a staggeringly high resolution version of some sort of travel documentary.

Promising, though.

Phil
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#5 Matthew Buick

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 03:13 PM

We've already got about 80 HD camera formats and a RED. If you ask me, the market is too crowded for this to be a success. Get rid of it before it kills film.
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#6 Richard Boddington

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 03:32 PM

Well I've said about 20 times on this board before this is yet another reason to shoot film. You can always re-scan it to a higher resolution level, can't do that with video.

R,
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#7 Matthew Buick

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 03:36 PM

But surely even 35mm will reach a point in which you've scanned every last bean.
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#8 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 03:52 PM

I'm sure the pictures are very nice, but resolution isn't what they should be worrying about - it's already pretty good. I'd much rather see advances in latitude and color rendition
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#9 Matthew Buick

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 04:03 PM

Indeed. The VariCam is rather impressive, though.

Edited by Matthew Buick, 31 May 2007 - 04:04 PM.

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#10 Z Will Ham

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 05:16 AM

Well I've said about 20 times on this board before this is yet another reason to shoot film. You can always re-scan it to a higher resolution level, can't do that with video.

R,

I agree. Film is always adaptable.

Does anyone think there will be a point where you can have too much resolution, and too much detail? To a point where it takes away from the shot, rather than add to it.
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#11 Nate Downes

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 09:42 AM

But surely even 35mm will reach a point in which you've scanned every last bean.

Yes, but 35mm is a moving target. The resolving ability of 35mm today is far greater than it was even 10 years ago. Plus, the same software used by HD cameras to turn their naturally soft images razor sharp can be applied to film, boosting it dramatically.

I did a test using a Super8 Tri-X frame, and used Canons image sharpening software. The results were close to incredible. I'll post it here in a bit for you all, ok?
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#12 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 10:23 AM

Does anyone think there will be a point where you can have too much resolution, and too much detail? To a point where it takes away from the shot, rather than add to it.


Sure, everytime you use a diffusion filter on some middle-aged actress' close-up.... but it's rare when you have too much resolution and detail in wide shots, and it's always easier to reduce it on the close-ups than to try and add it to wide shots when it's not there.
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#13 Daniel Sheehy

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 05:05 PM

With a bit rate of 24G bps, it's going to pose some interesting challenges for the workflow.

Might be interesting to see it run through Jannard's 'red-cine' wavelet compressor.
Who knows, that might just be the collaboration to knock the socks off us all! ;)

All joking aside, the company (NHK) have a very good track record with this kind of technical innovation.
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