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Hanging a small light from the ceiling


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#1 Natalie Saito

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 10:13 PM

I want to hang a light (small light or bulb..possibly china ball) on a ceiling. I was wondering how I could do that without drilling holes in the wall. this is a house. This is the probably the best category to ask this question. thanks for reading! -Natalie

Edited by NSaito, 31 May 2007 - 10:14 PM.

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#2 David Regan

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 11:25 PM

I want to hang a light (small light or bulb..possibly china ball) on a ceiling. I was wondering how I could do that without drilling holes in the wall. this is a house. This is the probably the best category to ask this question. thanks for reading! -Natalie



Quck and dirty; either gaff-tape the cord to the ceiling (not a great solution) or use those pull-off sticky plastic hooks, that use adhesive to stick to things. I've used small screw in hooks too that didn't need a big drill bit, but if you want to avoid even tiny holes probably not your best bet. Best advice is just be creative!

Good Luck
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#3 Lana Loukota

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 11:49 PM

You may be able to tape it up using painter's tape (it's like masking tape, but even gentler on painted walls) and be sure to tape the cord also at several places, so the weight of the cord doesn't drag down the light... But I haven't tried this myself (yet :) )
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#4 JD Hartman

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 07:54 AM

If there is a ceiling fixture in the room, see how securely it is mounted. You could always remove it and use the electrical box to hang your china ball from. Alternatives are: wall spreader; removeable picture hangers that 3M makes. The picture hangers have 3M's "command adhesive" that releases when a tab is pulled, doesn't damage the paint. Two of them, applied to the ceiling with the hooks facing opposite ways should provide more then enough holding power. Or drill, put in a plastic anchor and hook, when you have your shot, remove it and spackle the hole up .
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#5 robert duke

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 07:24 AM

I usually shoot in real locations and found that for china balls and small cord hanging bulbs laying painters tape over the cord and then back that up with some thumbtacks. the thumb tacks are small enough that a home owner doesnt mind. Failing that a wall spreader is the next zero damage with 360' viewing. If 360' is not an absolute must then a menace arm or boom does the job.
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#6 Alex Haspel

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 10:31 AM

if it's a really light light (ahem), why not use a polecat?


not sure if that's how they are called in overseas, so here's a picture:
Posted Image
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#7 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 10:04 PM

I would caution against using anything small and sharp such as a thumbtack just in case it falls to the ground unseen and then a family pet, barefoot person or somewho tying their shoe just happens to kneel in the spot where the thumbtack landed.

Great question by the way.
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#8 James Brown

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 04:38 AM

Hi,

As previously mentioned i think the best bet is a pole cat (depending on your room size) These will hold small kino's, china balls or 650's ect. If it's just a china ball you can always run it straight out of the light socket with a BC to Female plug (this is great for 360 so there is not a nasty cable coming down a wall)

Regards, James Brown
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#9 Natalie Saito

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 01:13 PM

about those "polecats"..

how much does it cost..and how much work is required to install them temporarily? based on looking at it: i was thinking that a "polecat" may be good for hanging a curtain (b/t 2 walls of a room)..i was going to just use a pair of c-stands for that.. but the room is not that wide. i dont need to rig a bunch of lights. i think a light bulb may work; but i need one that puts out quite a bit of power and illumination.

thanks guys!

--Natalie

Edited by NSaito, 04 June 2007 - 01:16 PM.

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#10 Alex Haspel

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 03:33 AM

about those "polecats"..

how much does it cost..and how much work is required to install them temporarily? based on looking at it: i was thinking that a "polecat" may be good for hanging a curtain (b/t 2 walls of a room)..i was going to just use a pair of c-stands for that.. but the room is not that wide. i dont need to rig a bunch of lights. i think a light bulb may work; but i need one that puts out quite a bit of power and illumination.

thanks guys!

--Natalie



a polecat costs about 3euros a day around here and it is installed within seconds.
and yes, you could also hang curtains off them, as long as they are not too heavy.
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#11 JD Hartman

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 01:29 PM

See this link for an image of a Polcat or wall-spreader:
http://www.msegrip.c...oducts_ID=24032

Your grip would already be familiar with their use.
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#12 Natalie Saito

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 11:07 PM

Posted Image

i was thinking of hanging a light from here. what's the most practical way of doing it? should i use a cardellini? if i do use just a bulb as key light: how would i hang it on a clamp or hook? thanks for reading!

Edited by NSaito, 06 June 2007 - 11:08 PM.

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#13 robert duke

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 12:57 AM

Posted Image

i was thinking of hanging a light from here. what's the most practical way of doing it? should i use a cardellini? if i do use just a bulb as key light: how would i hang it on a clamp or hook? thanks for reading!


that header is perfect for a c-clamp with baby pins, a furniture clamp, a bar clamp, or a speed c. I would bet that it is too wide for a cardelini. This is where you as a grip get creative. There is no one absolute right way. Use what tools you got, the object is to make it work. if it is just a bare bulb, you could just tie the cord to the clamp, tape it to a clamp, use sash to tie it to the clamp, use a spring clamp, and many other ways. Have fun engineer it and be creative.
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#14 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 06:26 AM

If there is a ceiling fixture in the room, see how securely it is mounted. You could always remove it and use the electrical box to hang your china ball from. Alternatives are: wall spreader; removeable picture hangers that 3M makes. The picture hangers have 3M's "command adhesive" that releases when a tab is pulled, doesn't damage the paint. Two of them, applied to the ceiling with the hooks facing opposite ways should provide more then enough holding power. Or drill, put in a plastic anchor and hook, when you have your shot, remove it and spackle the hole up .


What about not removing the fixture but trying to use it as an anchor point anyways?

What about those suction clamps that are used to mount smaller cameras to cars. Or will the ceiling surface will be too rough to even attempt it?
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#15 robert duke

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 05:57 PM

suction cups only work on smooth glass like surfaces of cars, boats, and windows. Even primer pain is too rough for them to hold.
I have had problems with the command adhesive sticking to ceilings. the pop corn ceilings interfere with the surface area required to hold anything.
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#16 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 01:53 AM

just use a C clamp with cardboard on the metal so you dont ruin the plaster.
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#17 Michael Morlan

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 10:00 AM

just use a C clamp with cardboard on the metal so you dont ruin the plaster.


Actually, cardboard won't be enough to protect the beam. Use 1x4 or 2x4 cribbing between clamp jaws and the plaster.

M
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