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#1 Natalie Saito

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 10:40 PM

many "consumer HD" cameras (i.e. hvx200, xlh1) are supported by avid/apple-friendly editing systems. im pretty new to editing (learning avid currently). i own adobe premiere and i was wondering if i could edit my HD footage on it. what is the hard drive space req. for HD?

thanks a bunch all!! -Natalie

Edited by NSaito, 02 June 2007 - 10:41 PM.

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#2 Dan Goulder

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 10:55 PM

Premiere should have an HDV preset. HDV is compressed to have a similar data rate to DV. DV will give you around 1hr. per 13Gb, so you should be in that neighborhood. Best of luck.
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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 09:37 AM

Hi,

You need to be a little bit careful about this.

HDV footage, as shot by the XLH1, JVC HD100 series, etc, is certainly cuttable on Premiere.

The Panasonic HVX-200 uses the P2 flash memory recording system, which is completely different. I have had some very bad experiences with P2 in the past - it seems to work very well if and only if you happen to be using one of the programs which has been specifically designed to support it. I am not aware that there is a P2 solution for Premiere - not that I'm saying there definitely isn't, but you should check before shooting a load of stuff.

Phil
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#4 Dan Goulder

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 01:59 PM

The Panasonic HVX-200 utilizes DVCPro HD (in high-def mode). If you're working in that particular format, I believe Premiere would require additional hardware, whereas FCP and Avid offer native presets. (If you're working with HDV, any of the above should be able to handle it in their latest versions, without special hardware.)
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 03:14 PM

Hi,

The problem is not just that it's DVCPRO-HD - it's DVCPRO-HD in several different MXF files distributed all over a PCMCIA card that takes special software to read.

They've very carefully made it about as cumbersome and difficult as possible.

Phil
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#6 Natalie Saito

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 05:05 PM

HDV footage, as shot by the XLH1, JVC HD100 series, etc, is certainly cuttable on Premiere.

The Panasonic HVX-200 uses the P2 flash memory recording system, which is completely different. I have had some very bad experiences with P2 in the past - it seems to work very well if and only if you happen to be using one of the programs which has been specifically designed to support it. I am not aware that there is a P2 solution for Premiere - not that I'm saying there definitely isn't, but you should check before shooting a load of stuff.

Phil



is there any pc editing system that is compatible with p2 cards.. or FCP? i know that it supports AVID. could i just dump the HD footage in PC laptop temporarily and after, tranport it to an editing system? is there a program that compresses the footage down to lo-res for editing and then blow it back to hi-res for home pcs? thanks!
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#7 Dan Goulder

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 05:29 PM

is there any pc editing system that is compatible with p2 cards.. or FCP? i know that it supports AVID. could i just dump the HD footage in PC laptop temporarily and after, tranport it to an editing system? is there a program that compresses the footage down to lo-res for editing and then blow it back to hi-res for home pcs? thanks!

Having not worked with p2 cards, I can't advise you on that. However, you shouldn't have to compress HDV or DVCPro HD any further than it already is, especially since typical modern desktops and many notebooks already have the horsepower to handle these formats in their current form. You can also edit these formats directly off a firewire drive without further compression.
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#8 Natalie Saito

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 11:28 PM

speaking of p2 cards...

what are the setbacks/thing to look for? and what do you think about renting them? i did hear that you can rent them. thanks all!

Edited by NSaito, 06 June 2007 - 11:29 PM.

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#9 CJ Henke III

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 05:52 PM

If you want to shoot with the p2 card, then go ahead. I'm assuming you have 1 8Gb P2 card that came free with the camera from Panasonic. The P2 card can be dumped in Premiere Pro CS3(only) or in FCP 6. However, what I would recommend is that you purchase an external hard drive of your choice (if the feature is over an hour long, make sure to purchase a terabyte hard drive). If you have a PCIMCA slot on your laptop (I assume you do), then you can just plug the P2 card in there and it acts as a removable flash memory card. You can then DRAG-AND-DROP the footage that you captured (all 8 mins of it) onto the HDD. Make sure to dump the footage into a separate_labeled folder each time. And when you go to edit the footage on which ever computer you choose, re-label the folder for each card CONTENTS, then Premiere Pro CS3 or Final Cut Pro 6 will read the data in the folder as a P2 Card. If you do not do this an error will pop-up stating that the files are in an improper directory.

Or you could save yourself the trouble and shoot with DVC-PRO tapes and edit with Final Cut Pro 5.0 or Higher, or Premiere Pro 2.0 or CS3.



All depends on what quality you are looking for.



PROs: Uncompressed footage captured from the P2 Cards

CONs: You only get 8 minutes per card (8 Gigs average), the cards cost $1,000 to purchase individually, and you can only hold 2 cards in the HVX-200 at once for a maximum of 16 minutes of Uncompressed footage.



You can change the camera settings and shoot longer, but if your going to go through the process of using a P2, I'm assuming that you are looking for the best quality footage possible.
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