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Creating the Hottest Night Ever.


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#1 Marquette Trishaun

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 07:51 PM

So it is late summer in Miami Florida. Two people are sharing a flat together on what might just be the hottest night in August.

The air conditioner is broken leaving only a simple metal fan to sustain life. Okay so maybe Spike Lee already achieved this in "Do the Right Thing," but I am curious as to what are best gels and overall color temperature to go for in this scene.

The reason I ask is that my initial inclination was to just warm the whole scene up with gelled tungsten lights and even possibly shoot with daylight balanced stock.

But recently I had a friend challenge this notion by insisting that a hot night in hell would almost appear white instead. Even so, how would one achieve this. With gels, or just do with color timing in the lab.

One last thing, does anyone has any experience with the Storaro series of gels being offered by Rosco.

-Thanks in advance,
Marquette
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 11:14 PM

I'd reference something like "In the Heat of the Night", "Apocalypse Now" or the many Sprite commercials that are out there.

A lot of white heat, a lot of hot reflective and sweaty surfaces...and of course a fan.
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#3 Marquette Trishaun

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 10:22 AM

I'd reference something like "In the Heat of the Night", "Apocalypse Now" or the many Sprite commercials that are out there.

A lot of white heat, a lot of hot reflective and sweaty surfaces...and of course a fan.



White heat? How do you make white heat. Is that just the neutral color of say tungsten light using tungsten balanced film. So in other words the orange tone is not the way to go?
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#4 Jimmy Browning

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 11:07 AM

White heat? How do you make white heat. Is that just the neutral color of say tungsten light using tungsten balanced film. So in other words the orange tone is not the way to go?


He might mean glare because he mentions reflective surfaces. When you go outside on a hot summer day, what do you see? The white blown-out specular glare of the sun off of cars and sidewalks and glass surfaces. That helps to indicate heat. But your scene is at night inside an flat, so I'm not sure that would be appropriate.

I think in that setting, the best ways to indicate heat is not so much with gels as with props. Like he said, have a fan on in the shot, give them a spritz of "sweat" before the shot, have them wear very light clothing, the windows open, their hair damp and stuck to them, etc. I personally wouldn't overdo it with the gels unless your film has an artsy mood to it. I would warm it up subtly, and also make sure a lot of the set design is warm in tone if that's feasable.

You could also add glare on reflective surfaces if you can believably motivate it, but that would come from light sources in the house.

Jimmy
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#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 08:02 PM

He might mean glare...


(In an Ed McMahon voice) You are correct sir!
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#6 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 02:03 PM

If you can justify having warm light through the windows (say from Sodium streetlights) then that would help. Other than that, it's down to props and makeup, as others have said.
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Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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