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Technical Operations one must know


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#1 David Calson

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 09:23 PM

Hey I'm an aspiring videographer. I'm trying to learn how to do the more technically difficult operations involved with operating a camera. Trouble is, I don't know what these operations are
Outside of white balancing, back focusing, resetting timecode, using bars/tone, setting correct exposure, what other advanced operations you do on a continual basis? You don't have to go into detail as to how to do these operations, I'm just looking for stuff to google, thank you.
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#2 Daniel Sheehy

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 11:19 PM

Hey I'm an aspiring videographer. I'm trying to learn how to do the more technically difficult operations involved with operating a camera. Trouble is, I don't know what these operations are
Outside of white balancing, back focusing, resetting timecode, using bars/tone, setting correct exposure, what other advanced operations you do on a continual basis? You don't have to go into detail as to how to do these operations, I'm just looking for stuff to google, thank you.


Light & block out a scene.
Maintain continuity of action within a scene, while shooting adequate coverage.
And these days as well, you'll often be expected to be able to create different 'looks' using the camera settings.

http://www.cybercoll...com/tvp_ind.htm have some good reading.
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#3 David Calson

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 11:44 PM

Light & block out a scene.
Maintain continuity of action within a scene, while shooting adequate coverage.
And these days as well, you'll often be expected to be able to create different 'looks' using the camera settings.

http://www.cybercoll...com/tvp_ind.htm have some good reading.



Very good website, thanks Daniel. How bout some more procedures, like technically thick video engineering operations. I heard some people talk about genlocking, matrixes, knee, etc. Stuff in that neighborhood.
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#4 Daniel Sheehy

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 03:46 AM

Matrices, knee settings, gamma curves, detail settings, chroma levels & phase are increasingly in-camera options these days. Using these is all part of creating a 'look' for the project.

Genlocking is a feature of multicamera projects such as OB's with multiple cameras switching live.
It is the use of a referance signal to keep various cameras or other pieces of equipment in sync with eachother. The details are rather technical and I'm not qualified or experienced enough to go into detail... someone like Phil would be a better person to ask.
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 10:11 AM

The problem with fiddling with the matrix and other similar low-level settings is that you can easily make a very big mess. You can end up with something that looks OK on set, but proves impossible to grade; you can end up creating problems which are unfixable, etc. Matrixing is particularly dangerous as it can end up affecting colours you didn't have on the test chart - suddenly someone walks into frame wearing a red shirt and it's purple, or something. It should really only be done in a controlled viewing environment with calibrated studio monitors, and the appropriate test-and-measurement equipment - a properly-lit test chart, a waveform monitor, and a vectorscope, usually, for making matrix adjustments.

What's particularly critical is knowing both artistically and contractually what's wanted. If it's a broadcast TV show, the producers are liable to have quite conservative visual tastes, and technical QC requirements with regard to the people they're selling the feed to. If it's a drama, you may be able to go a bit further, but it should always be the subject of careful discussion. Usually it's a case of combining technical and artistic goals to the best possible compromise.

To be honest it isn't much done - I've only fiddled with matrix a couple of times, although selecting lower contrast gamma curves is a fairly normal operation. Most of this stuff should be done with reference to tests.

It's hard to get too technical on this as most cameras implement it differently.

Phil
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 03:25 PM

http://books.elsevie...nity=focalbooks

http://cinematograph.../shop/books.asp
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