Jump to content


Photo

Processing 3 year old film


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 James Paonessa

James Paonessa

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Savannah,GA

Posted 11 June 2007 - 12:50 PM

This weekend a buddy and I were "employed" to film a colleague of ours wedding. We had access to a super-16 so what the hell why not, plus he was even providing the film. great, awesome! Well the day rolls around and we grab the film from him. Well I guess I cant complain to much since I wasn't paying for the film, but he hands us a recan from a previous project....from 3 years ago. With him being a responsible filmmaker, I know it was kept in the freezer, but I would like to know if their is anything different I should get them to do during processing. Another colleague of mine suggested we overexpose by half a stop but he wasnt really positive if the aging would be that big of a difference. Currently the film is overexposed by a full stop with anticipation of pulling it 1 stop. Any suggestions?

Oh yeah, film was Kodak 7278 200t


-James Paonessa
  • 0

#2 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1584 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 11 June 2007 - 01:47 PM

This weekend a buddy and I were "employed" to film a colleague of ours wedding. We had access to a super-16 so what the hell why not, plus he was even providing the film. great, awesome! Well the day rolls around and we grab the film from him. Well I guess I cant complain to much since I wasn't paying for the film, but he hands us a recan from a previous project....from 3 years ago. With him being a responsible filmmaker, I know it was kept in the freezer, but I would like to know if their is anything different I should get them to do during processing. Another colleague of mine suggested we overexpose by half a stop but he wasnt really positive if the aging would be that big of a difference. Currently the film is overexposed by a full stop with anticipation of pulling it 1 stop. Any suggestions?

Oh yeah, film was Kodak 7278 200t
-James Paonessa



Have your lab run a short "clip" test and put it on the densitometer to get an idea of base fog / aging, etc. and then make a judgment on the pull.

-Rob-
  • 0

#3 Michael Collier

Michael Collier
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1262 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 11 June 2007 - 09:08 PM

I shot some 7274 (200t, color)a few weeks ago, that was likewise about 3 years old (freezer stored) and didn't encounter any problems at all. Especially if your going to telecine this film, you have lots of room to correct small drifts in contrast and density. I would overexpose normaly (a stop or less). Being black and white you shouldn't have much problems with it. Either way, its his film and his wedding, so shrug and enjoy the free film!


(by the way, you say 7278 is 200t, but I think its 160t, 200d B/W reversal...unless you meant 7274 which is 200t color)
  • 0

#4 Nick Mulder

Nick Mulder
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1023 posts
  • Other
  • Auckland, New Zealand

Posted 11 June 2007 - 10:16 PM

I've had near on 30 year old non refrigerated (but not left in the sun for instance) Kodak B+W film wedge tested and it passed with flying colors (guffaw guffaw) - that was plus-x tho, a bit slower - but still 30 years old (rusty tins etc...)
  • 0

#5 Patrick Cooper

Patrick Cooper
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 868 posts
  • Other

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:33 AM

I agree - don't bother 'pulling' the film in processing. Pulling would reduce contrast. Just overexpose as you normally would with negative film and process normally. This is of course assuming that it really is negative film that you are exposing! Can you confirm that it is in fact 200T and not 200D B&W reversal?
  • 0

#6 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1584 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:09 AM

I agree - don't bother 'pulling' the film in processing. Pulling would reduce contrast. Just overexpose as you normally would with negative film and process normally. This is of course assuming that it really is negative film that you are exposing! Can you confirm that it is in fact 200T and not 200D B&W reversal?



The age and type of stock should survive a mere 3 years in the fridge I would think it would be fine too.

-Rob-
  • 0

#7 Patrick Neary

Patrick Neary
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 873 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Portland, OR

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:49 PM

Hi-

On a lark, I just shot and souped some 8521 that was more like 12 years old, and it was just a little foggy, not too bad!
  • 0

#8 Steve Zimmerman

Steve Zimmerman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 196 posts
  • Other
  • Charleston, SC USA

Posted 12 June 2007 - 05:52 PM

I was camera/DP on a 35mm short where the director bought the film off ebay. The seller from LA said he got the film from some producer's garage. ;) We did overexpose half a stop. It was the old EXR 500 speed

The image alternated from pretty decent and soft, to suddenly grainy, especially in the shadow areas. Bad age fog all around. The director spent $900 on that transfer! Was it worth it? No. I'm never buying film off ebay myself. Those professional short end sellers ore OK.
  • 0

#9 Jon Kukla

Jon Kukla
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Other

Posted 13 June 2007 - 10:14 PM

If it's three years old, even with ideal storage conditions, it's still going to be subjected to a lot of gamma radiation (unavoidable), which will raise the base fog and increase graininess. 200T should be okay, but not fabulous. I would overexpose a full stop - half a stop for the aging and half a stop as per normal overexposure protection. And I also agree - pulling is a bad idea - you're overexposing to counteract the effects of the aging. If you don't fully develop, it defeats the purpose, unless you were intending to pull for aesthetic reasons (in which case I'd advise overexposing two stops and pulling one - but DEFINITELY test that first).
  • 0


rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

The Slider

CineLab

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Opal

CineTape

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Technodolly