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Shooting In The Shade


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#1 Michael Barett

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 02:14 PM

I've noticed a lot of people ask about shooting in the sun and what to expose for when it comes to sunsets and high backlight. Just to ask two quick questions, when shooting in open shade and the sun is your backlight if you add some fill via HMI or reflector should you still underexpose by about a stop to make the face seem like the shaded side of the sun? Also in shade (not open) like a path that is blocked out from direct sunlight because of trees should you expose at full key.

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Michael
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#2 Michael Collier

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 03:39 PM

For the backlight situation, yes I would underexpose the face a bit. Maybe even up to a stop and a half. You can still see detail easily in that, and you want to sell the fact they are in the shade. That said what I typically do is over expose for the background a bit, 1-2 stops over, then use the fill to bring it up until it looks good to the eye. That is usually in the .5-1.5 stop below key range, but I have pushed it to 2-2.5 if I am going for dramatic.

I assume your second question is asking what if there is nothing catching open sunlight in frame (its all in shade) then yes you would want to expose faces to key. In shade your eyes adjust and the shade becomes key exposure, at least to you. When there is direct sunlight typicaly the eyes adjust in between the contrast range, so the background is hot, and the faces are still a bit shadowed.
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#3 Michael Barett

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 06:01 PM

For the backlight situation, yes I would underexpose the face a bit. Maybe even up to a stop and a half. You can still see detail easily in that, and you want to sell the fact they are in the shade. That said what I typically do is over expose for the background a bit, 1-2 stops over, then use the fill to bring it up until it looks good to the eye. That is usually in the .5-1.5 stop below key range, but I have pushed it to 2-2.5 if I am going for dramatic.

I assume your second question is asking what if there is nothing catching open sunlight in frame (its all in shade) then yes you would want to expose faces to key. In shade your eyes adjust and the shade becomes key exposure, at least to you. When there is direct sunlight typicaly the eyes adjust in between the contrast range, so the background is hot, and the faces are still a bit shadowed.


Thanks, when your talking about .5-1.5 stop below key, you mean the face is is about half to a stop and a half under.
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#4 Michael Barett

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 11:54 AM

Also when using a filter such as an orange (for black and white) or a pola to darken the sky should you still split and in your split throw in the compensation of light lost.

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Rig Wheels Passport

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