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How to judje a good colourist from a bad one


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#1 Melanie Fernandes

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 01:26 AM

Dear all,
wanted some help. How do i tell while viewing a showreel, a good colorist for the Da vinci vis-a-vis a bad one?


Thanks!
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#2 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 02:55 AM

A reel is not that helpful in making these judgment calls because you never see the original material, and of course, you are watching his best work.

I think talking to the people you have in mind, and running some short tests with them can be a big help. In my experience, I have worked with very few good colorists. I have worked with many okay ones, and about just as many horrible ones.

Test, test, test!

Kevin Zanit
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#3 Melanie Fernandes

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 03:35 AM

A reel is not that helpful in making these judgment calls because you never see the original material, and of course, you are watching his best work.

I think talking to the people you have in mind, and running some short tests with them can be a big help. In my experience, I have worked with very few good colorists. I have worked with many okay ones, and about just as many horrible ones.

Test, test, test!

Kevin Zanit


Hi Kevin,
Thanks for the response. Agree with what you're saying but given my line of work, a showreel is all i have in the beginning before i actually work with a colourist. Am an asst producer/line producer.Hence, before convincing the director about the colourist I need to know what I am looking at. Is there anything specific I can watch out for?Like crushed blacks, saturation, hues... anything that sets basic parameters for judgement?
Coz I really dont know how to tell a good one from a bad one!
All I know is, if someone can work without us having to supply references of the look and achieve what's expected on the brief, that's good enough for the way we work in India.

Any further suggestions?

Cheers!
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#4 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 03:55 AM

Using references is a good way to communicate the director and DP's intentions to the colorist. I feel it is very important to have the cinematographer involved in this step as he is the one who would likely be able to make the best decisions on these types of things.

There is no right and wrong, if you know what you want the piece to look like and NOT look like, watch the reels and see if someone comes close to what you are looking for. Then you know he can do something you will be happy with.
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#5 Tony Brown

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 01:04 PM

Just what is it you require of them? Get them to do some best lights along the way and decide who grasps your intentions the best before you go to fine grade
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Abel Cine

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post