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How is this camera test? Kodak 200T


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#1 Galen Carter-Jeffrey

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 09:33 PM

I shot a roll of Kodak 200T as a camera test. I used a Canon 1014 AZ

Is this normal? It looks pretty bad? What went wrong?


https://webspace.ute.....mera Test.mov

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#2 Richardson Leao

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 09:56 PM

I shot a roll of Kodak 200T as a camera test. I used a Canon 1014 AZ

Is this normal? It looks pretty bad? What went wrong?
https://webspace.ute.....mera Test.mov

Posted Image


it's either

1. the processing of the film;
2. the telecine;

or more unlikely a spoiled film.

The camera factors look fine (stable, no scratches etc).
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#3 John Hyde

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 11:09 PM

Looks like typical underexposed 64T. I would guess that the camera you are using does not read 64T properly. Color was probably toned down due to underexposure during the telecine (to keep noise down to a minimum).

For better compatibility, I would try Velvia 50D, 200T neg or TriX black and white. Those films are compatible with just about any camera.
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#4 adam berk

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 11:30 PM

Who did the telecine? My gut is telling me that this is the problem.
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#5 Nate Downes

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 05:37 AM

I've seen similar results in a one-light transfer when a) the first footage was overexposed and B) you'd forgotten to use an 85 filter.

What we have here is the entire blue channel is pretty much missing.
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#6 Galen Carter-Jeffrey

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 10:17 AM

I've seen similar results in a one-light transfer when a) the first footage was overexposed and B) you'd forgotten to use an 85 filter.

What we have here is the entire blue channel is pretty much missing.


I used cinelab. Now that I think about it I think it was 64T.

When using the canon 1014 there isa little screw on the bottom with a lightbulb on it. How do I know when to use it and when not to?
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#7 Nate Downes

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 10:31 AM

When outdoors or with daylight, don't touch it. If inside, use it.

And that sounds about right for underexposed 64t
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#8 Galen Carter-Jeffrey

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 11:15 AM

When outdoors or with daylight, don't touch it. If inside, use it.

And that sounds about right for underexposed 64t


That means the filter is usually in the on position?
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#9 Nate Downes

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 11:40 AM

That means the filter is usually in the on position?


Right. But in your case, just underexposed.
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#10 Galen Carter-Jeffrey

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 12:51 PM

Right. But in your case, just underexposed.



So this is filtered fine, just under exposed.

I need to make a chart because the filer thing is still a little confusing.

If I have daylight film what do i do if
Shooting outdoors
Shooting Indoors

If I have tungsten film what do i do if
Shooting outdoors
Shooting indoors
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#11 steve hyde

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 01:32 PM

...It looks like the colorist specifically went for a sepia-toned look during the transfer... It's 64T right -not color negative like you posted? If it is 64T you should project the film to see what the colors really look like. Or just put a strip of film down on a light table and look at it with a loupe. Based on the footage you have shown, I think the exposure and film processing are fine and the transfer is where you lost all your colors..

If you forgot to use the daylight filter your film will look discernibly blue because 85 daylight filters are amber in color and they are designed to filter blue rays from the sun. It might be that your film is blue and the colorist decided to go to a more gray-scale look to compensate..

Virtually all Super 8 film is tungsten balanced film which is a film designed for photography under artificial lights. Unlike sunlight - tungsten lights have more yellow rays rather than blue rays so tungsten balanced film looks "normal" when unfiltered indoors under artificial, incandescent, fluorescent, halogen and tungsten lights. (all artificial lights have different "color temperatures" so this is why professional cinematographers use light meters that measure color temperature so that they can make better informed choices about exposure and filtering.


If you shoot tungsten balanced film indoors it will look "normal" unfiltered
If you shoot tungsten balanced film outdoors unfiltered it will look blue (unless you use an amber filter - which is built in to your Canon 814.)

If you shoot daylight balanced film indoors it will look yellow (unless you use a blue filter)

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#12 Terry Mester

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 10:51 PM

If I have daylight film what do i do if
Shooting outdoors
Shooting Indoors

If I have tungsten film what do i do if
Shooting outdoors
Shooting indoors


The Daylight Film Cartridges will automatically push the internal 85A Daylight Filter OUT.

If you shoot daylight balanced film indoors it will look yellow (unless you use a blue filter)


Steve, do you know if some Cameras incorporate a Blue Filter into the Lens? The Lenses on my Sankyo and Argus look Blueish. Do you think this could be a Blue Filter?
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#13 steve hyde

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Posted 16 June 2007 - 12:08 PM

...no. There are not blue filters in super 8 cameras. Blue filters are not commonly used because there are no real good reasons to shoot daylight balanced stocks under tungsten light - Plus some artificial light sources are daylight balanced - HMIs etc. not to mention that historically, there were no daylight balanced super 8 color films until recently. PRo8, Spectra, Wittier etc. now sells Velvia and Kodak 100D. .. by the way, when shooting black and white stocks filtration is not required - but you can use the filter in bright light if you want to loose a stop.

If you see blue in your lens - you are seeing the multi-spectral lens coatings, which most often look magenta to the naked eye.
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#14 Mark Dunn

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Posted 16 June 2007 - 12:36 PM

The 85 filter only absorbs 2/3 of a stop. The 80A filter to convert daylight film to tungsten loses you 2 stops. So it's much better to shoot tungsten film outdoors with a filter than vice versa. You get to use a slower film.
The old Kodachrome 25D would have gone to 6 ISO in tungsten light- very inconvenient.
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#15 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 16 June 2007 - 06:29 PM

...not to mention that historically, there were no daylight balanced super 8 color films until recently....



That might not be true. I seem to recall that earlier Kodachrome was balanced for daylight and looked amazing in outdoor situations.
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