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Scene near the pool


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#1 XiaoSu Han

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 02:37 AM

hi

we are about to shoot a scene by the pool with about 100 asa

i wanted to get the reflections of the water on the faces of the people plus i want to bring out the light blueish tone which the pool walls already have (a shot includes the pool=)
we have been thinking about hydroflexe's underwater pars, but thinking again, if we arent shooting underwater at all, wouldnt usual hmis shot into the water be enough?

if anyone's got experience with that, i'd love to read about it

thanks in advance
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#2 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 03:56 AM

I am assuming this is a night scene?

I did a big night time party scene around a pool, I wanted the pool to glow (it was in the shot), and I also wanted some moving water effects to be projected on the set and talent.

For the pool I just bounced 10 or so 1k PARs spread around the pool (out of frame) to light up the pool fairly evenly.

I also had additional light sources for the party (18k 'moon light' and then a bunch of smaller units), and they did exactly what I was looking for.

01.jpg
02.jpg
03.jpg

The shot was one big Steadicam move (done fantastically by Randy Nolan) that follows the girl (below) through the party and ending in a MS of these two couples.
01.jpg
02.jpg

(note these still were taken directly off of the waveform monitor, they are a bit off from the final image, my DIT felt the gamma was different as was the noise level)

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#3 Arvin Farahmand

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 02:36 PM

They look really good Kevin. What did you shoot with? What monitor are those stills off of?

Also, a small note/question:

In the fourth picture (with the girl crouching by the pool) on top of the frame I can make out the bottom of light stands, possibly stand bags, and the harsh shadows that PARs seem to be casting. I'm guessing this is just a random still with parts of the set showing and not actual footage, correct?

If this is actual footage, what is that supposed to be, and what is the motivation for such a low angled harsh light?

(sorry for sounding obtuse but I'm just picky with details)
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#4 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 08:02 PM

The shadows being cast are from lit tike torches actually, no lighting gear on that side of the set. That is a uncorrected grab from either a rehearsal or a take.

The light is lower than I would have liked it to be, just no way to go any higher (in a practical way). It was an 18k about 24' high (slightly taller than the roof of the house), so it is somewhat low angle. That said, the part of the take that this still is from is only on screen for a few seconds, so no real time to study it like we can off a still, so I am not real concerned.
04.jpg

The camera was a Panavised F900 and the still was taken off a Leader Waveform monitor with a CF card slot.

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#5 Bob Hayes

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Posted 16 June 2007 - 07:55 AM

Great lighting Kevin! With regards to shoot lights at pools. Bouncing off the water will give a pretty good effect. Be sure you bag all the lights securely and watch out for puddles of water. If you have actors or crew in the water use a GFI to reduce the chance of electrocution.
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#6 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 02:14 AM

I second the GFIs, I forgot to mention them originally, I guess it should be said that safety around water should be one of the main concerns.
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#7 XiaoSu Han

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 06:50 AM

thank you very much!
your still looks very good, although it woould be a bit to high key for our purpose ;)

but the pool looks exactly like i wanted it.. so i will go for something like this in our shot!

maybe i can take a few stills as well and post them too after the shoot!


thanks again
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#8 Xavier Plaza

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 10:43 AM

Hi:

Bob and Kevin what is GFI ???
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#9 Tim Terner

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 03:02 PM

Hi:
Bob and Kevin what is GFI ???

http://www.misterfixit.com/gfi.htm
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#10 Jimmy Browning

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 06:06 PM

I did a big night time party scene around a pool, I wanted the pool to glow (it was in the shot), and I also wanted some moving water effects to be projected on the set and talent.

For the pool I just bounced 10 or so 1k PARs spread around the pool (out of frame) to light up the pool fairly evenly.



Out of curiousity, why did you choose PARs specifically?
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#11 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 06:57 PM

Because they are cheap, put out a lot of light and don't pull much power. Plus, I already had 12 of them on the show for another location (10 of which are my personal gear).
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#12 Xavier Plaza

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 08:16 PM

thanks Kevin i know the concept "GFI", just i didn't know what means the abbreviation, now i know... Very useful link...



than you
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#13 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 10:34 PM

Ah, well then thank Tim Terner for the link ;)
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