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#1 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 22 June 2007 - 03:34 PM

Recently a friend of mine who was shooting a documentary about reptiles asked me this.How would you show the point of view of a lizard who has two eyes on each side of his head that operate independently of each other? Would you show a split screen or would you somehow morph the two images?

Opinions?

I remember an old documentary about insects that showed a POV shot of an insect with compound eyes and they used a lens that broke the image up into multiple smaller images.
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 05:50 AM

Recently a friend of mine who was shooting a documentary about reptiles asked me this.How would you show the point of view of a lizard who has two eyes on each side of his head that operate independently of each other? Would you show a split screen or would you somehow morph the two images?

Opinions?

I remember an old documentary about insects that showed a POV shot of an insect with compound eyes and they used a lens that broke the image up into multiple smaller images.


I've seen prism filters for 3 and 5 images and perhaps more, but I don't recall one for four, although I assume that's not impossible???

During edit each section of the separate image areas would have a P.O.V. superimposed. The simple solution would be to do a delay so one POV shot could be used four times, two of the four being flipped around, and none of the four exactly in sync. The problem with this idea however is if the POV were to reveal another moving species, it wouldn't make sense to see it start to move at different moments in time in each image area, although that might look comically bad.

Visualize four quadrants on the screen, each taking up a quad of space. Perhaps if one shot a wide enough POV shot, and with enough clarity, then in post one could digitally zoom into different quadrants of the same frame, with some overlap, now any other animal that is being viewed via the POV is free to move around and it will be represented as being viewed differently by each eye but in sync with every other eye.
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 10:59 AM

I would shoot two separate POVs, one for each eye. I would blend them in post so they don't quite meet in the center since, I assume, there is a blind spot in the middle...?
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#4 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 01:49 PM

I assume, there is a blind spot in the middle...?


That's what I'm unsure about.Humans don't have a blind spot in the middle,we get an almost 180 degree view.I'm wondering if these lizards get an unobstructed almost 360 degree view that's as close to merged as ours is.But then a lizard's brain isn't as complex as a human's.Maybe I should pose this question to a biologist that specializes in reptiles.
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Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

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