Jump to content


Photo

Inclement weather


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 G McMahon

G McMahon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 June 2007 - 07:10 PM

Hello all,

I am on my first day of a three day paid corporate/ promotional.

I arrived at location this morning and the weather was awful. We shot a couple of shots (mainly a test for the HD transfer for edit). The director called it and we are rescheduling for latter this week (wed thru fri).

How do I charge? Is it a half day today? I now have to go and return camera gear, and most likely pick it up tomorrow. At present I am only charging an hourly rate for gear pick up.

What happens if I invoice them and they kick up a stink. Should they be versed in costs for loss of shooting because of the weather?

This leads me to another question. What happens with weather holds? Say you are shooting mon to wed and there is a weather hold thur. Do you invoice them for the weather hold day, considering you cannot get booked for that day? What happens if one of the days is cancelled before you leave home, do you still charge?

Thank you,
  • 0

#2 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 25 June 2007 - 09:47 PM

Hello all,

I am on my first day of a three day paid corporate/ promotional.

I arrived at location this morning and the weather was awful. We shot a couple of shots (mainly a test for the HD transfer for edit). The director called it and we are rescheduling for latter this week (wed thru fri).

How do I charge? Is it a half day today? I now have to go and return camera gear, and most likely pick it up tomorrow. At present I am only charging an hourly rate for gear pick up.

What happens if I invoice them and they kick up a stink. Should they be versed in costs for loss of shooting because of the weather?

This leads me to another question. What happens with weather holds? Say you are shooting mon to wed and there is a weather hold thur. Do you invoice them for the weather hold day, considering you cannot get booked for that day? What happens if one of the days is cancelled before you leave home, do you still charge?

Thank you,


I would invoice a half day for the cancellation and a half day for the hold, since it's a similar situation as a travel day (i.e. not working but can't do other stuff)
  • 0

#3 Brad Grimmett

Brad Grimmett
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2660 posts
  • Steadicam Operator
  • Los Angeles

Posted 26 June 2007 - 12:14 AM

I would (and have) charge full rate for the day that got cancelled. That's why production companies have weather insurance. Regarding the hold day for weather, I'm not sure. I guess a half day sounds about right. But truthfully, you should know what to do in these situations before they come up, and you should discuss them when you're hired for the job. I know that's tough to do a lot of the time, but you should at least have an idea of what the producer expects, and they should know what you expect. They should be well aware that you're not planning on working for free because it starts raining. You're not the one who scheduled the shoot outdoors, they are.
  • 0

#4 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 26 June 2007 - 08:27 PM

That's all good to know, brad. Out of curiosity, what is the usual cancellation window before a scheduled day where you will and won't invoice production? I guess I'm asking how much notice do you require of production that a day is cancelled and how do you generally handle that?
  • 0

#5 Brad Grimmett

Brad Grimmett
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2660 posts
  • Steadicam Operator
  • Los Angeles

Posted 27 June 2007 - 01:50 AM

Well, it doesn't happen very often, but the standard cutoff is 24 hours. Personally, I think this is way too short since it's very hard to pick up another job in that amount of time, but I believe the union set that standard. Truthfully, it would be hard to get paid on a short cancellation anyway unless it was a union job. Most clients would just refuse to pay.
  • 0

#6 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 27 June 2007 - 09:55 PM

Well, it doesn't happen very often, but the standard cutoff is 24 hours. Personally, I think this is way too short since it's very hard to pick up another job in that amount of time, but I believe the union set that standard. Truthfully, it would be hard to get paid on a short cancellation anyway unless it was a union job. Most clients would just refuse to pay.


That's good to keep in mind. Thanks a bunch, Brad. I'm new to all of these type of things that I never learned in school.
  • 0

#7 Brad Grimmett

Brad Grimmett
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2660 posts
  • Steadicam Operator
  • Los Angeles

Posted 28 June 2007 - 05:03 AM

That's good to keep in mind. Thanks a bunch, Brad. I'm new to all of these type of things that I never learned in school.

No problem.
This is a bit off the subject, but the above statement is part of the reason I wouldn't necessarily recommend film school to people. You just don't learn a lot of important stuff about the business in film school that you do while working in the business. It's easy to learn how to set a C-stand or load a mag. You can learn those things anywhere. The harder thing is learning how to last in this business, and that involves actually LEARNING about the business.
  • 0

#8 G McMahon

G McMahon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 28 June 2007 - 07:49 AM

No problem.
This is a bit off the subject, but the above statement is part of the reason I wouldn't necessarily recommend film school to people. You just don't learn a lot of important stuff about the business in film school that you do while working in the business. It's easy to learn how to set a C-stand or load a mag. You can learn those things anywhere. The harder thing is learning how to last in this business, and that involves actually LEARNING about the business.

I just hate the fine line between being a team player or someone being taken advantage of.

Thanks,
  • 0

#9 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 29 June 2007 - 04:23 PM

No problem.
This is a bit off the subject, but the above statement is part of the reason I wouldn't necessarily recommend film school to people. You just don't learn a lot of important stuff about the business in film school that you do while working in the business. It's easy to learn how to set a C-stand or load a mag. You can learn those things anywhere. The harder thing is learning how to last in this business, and that involves actually LEARNING about the business.


Yeah, it's disappointing that it's not standard to learn. I actuall doubt that anyone in the program I went to really knows that kind of stuff. It was a very independant filmmaking oriented school so most of the faculty (save one or two) all graduated, made some films on grant money, then started teaching.
  • 0


The Slider

CineTape

CineLab

Opal

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

The Slider

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

CineTape

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Glidecam