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Evening


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#1 Adam Thompson

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 12:43 AM

Just saw the trailer for Evening at the theatre and was really wowed compared to the others that were showing. I don't recall what it's about but man, did it look good.

Mr. Pados looks like he knows his stuff! It's definately a chic-flick but I'll tag along with the gf just to (secretly) check out the photography! Anyone here work on it? I assume I was looking at a well tweaked DI in addition to some raw talent. I'm also curious how much the director was involved with the camera since he's a very experienced DP himself.
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 03:06 AM

It's definitely something different that Pados is doing in this film...in comparison to his past work (Kontroll is a brilliant film). The shots in the trailer are quite gorgeous, I can only hope it's consistent throughout.

I said the same thing to my wife, a total "chick-flick", but I really wanna see it too. Reminds me of "The Notebook", which I was pleasantly surprised by.
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#3 Frank DiBugnara

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Posted 01 July 2007 - 02:42 PM

I saw it last night and very much loved the cinematography. The film constantly cuts back and forth between the present day and 1950's era flashbacks. I kept trying to figure out what photographic characteristics were unique to each era to make them so incredibly different. I'm sure art direction had a lot to do with it. The flashbacks were all very bright and included a palate of primary colors that were in general timed cooler while the present day was darker/higher contrast, warmer, and more earth-toned. It seemed as though the representation of the 50's was almost part reality and part a younger man's impression of what the 50's were like (The DP was born in 1969). There was almost a sense that he was trying to use some of the photographic techniques of that era, emulating the lighting that would accompany old, slower film stocks. This all served to portray the 50's as an innocent and pristine time in contrast to the severity of the present day.

The use of natural light throughout was inspiring and inventive, and even though extreme at times, did not feel forced (something I'm always afraid of when getting gutsy). One scene in particular where light was streaming in through the window and bounced off the floor. You never saw the light hitting the floor, but reflection off what must have been a wood floor onto the actress served as a warm bright and soft key coming from below. By seeing the light on her face, you could imagine what was going on with the light in a part of the room that you never saw.

As a DP/Director who does not get to direct as much narrative as I'd like, I realized that when I look at films like this, I'm sort of make-believe auditioning DPs to try to figure out if the film I'm seeing represents the work of someone I'm compatible with artistically. And with this comes the realization that I should not be looking for someone who would light it exactly the way I would, but rather someone who would offer more photographically than I could, but all within compatible artistic taste. I think 95% of the time; the answer was "yes"! The only two things I could remember that jumped out at me were the very cool and sometimes very over exposed practicals in the 50's era (when I think of a 50's era practical, I think of a very warm light, not something that has the look of modern gas-based light, for example) and the bright moonlight that had almost no blue in it. Cinematography is so subjective. One can only hope to work with such incredible artists some day.
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