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Do I need a Wratten filter?


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#1 Mirko Horstmann

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 03:13 AM

Hello,

this is certainly a rather newbish question and I hope you don't mind if I ask things like that now while I slowly accumulate all the things for my first attempts at 16mm...

I have bought some rolls of EXR 500T on Ebay quite cheap (hope they are still ok, but if they aren't they will at least suffice for some tests). I understand that it is common practice to use a Wratten 85 filter when shooting in daylight. Is this also necessary if I shoot on tungsten balanced negative stock in daylight and only want it transfered to digital? As negative film has this orange tint to it I reckon there has to be massive color correction in the transfer process anyway. So, can the conversion from daylight to tungsten be done during transfer or even afterwards without compromising the quality to much?

Thanks,
Mirko
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#2 Nick Mulder

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 05:38 AM

So, can the conversion from daylight to tungsten be done during transfer or even afterwards without compromising the quality to much?


Yes

...that being said I personally prefer to use the filters,

I love the packets, theres something romantic about them.
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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 05:59 AM

Given the speed of your 500T stock, you'll also need an ND filter for most exterior work, so a combination 85 and ND 0.6 filter will get you into the aperture range of most lenses
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#4 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 11:44 AM

Mind that the 85 (or 85B ) wratten Kodak that does the conversion already cuts the light by 2/3 of a stop (never mind if you meter through the lens). So the 500 EXR will fall at 320 with the conversion filter, at 160 with 85 + N3, at 80 with 85 + N6.

You actually could work with no filter if going to edit digital, if you don't mind the image - or want the image - to be a bit cold, bluish like, or work by sunrise/fall in the warm light, or by night (outside town). Also, even though you correct the whole image in post, some bluish will persist in the low lights (blacks, shadows) but some systems allow you to correct even more in the low lights.
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#5 Dominic Case

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 07:22 PM

Adding a WR85 is not strictly about colour correction (i.e. making it look right), it is about adjusting the ratio of red, green and blue illumination so that all emulsion layers on the stock are exposed correctly. Shooting in daylight without a 85 means that the blue-srensitive layer will be exposed 2-3 stops more than the red-sensitive layer.

That said, the latitude of most negative emulsions is enough that you can usually get away with this provided the film is well-exposed, and there isn't too great a brightness range in the scene. As lauren points out, you may need to colour-correct the shadows a little more than the overall balance.

The orange colour of negative stocks isn't a factor in any way: any scanning or transfer system is balanced to match that.
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#6 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 12:17 PM

Tungsten balanced film exposed in most daylight conditions will be more than a bit blue.
It is a very good idea to get the image as close as you can to what you want as a final image on the film while shooting.
Emergency situations such as lack of T stop are when you totally correct in post.
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#7 Mark Dunn

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Posted 29 June 2007 - 11:52 AM

The orange colour is a tone correction mask. It's to correct for dye deficiencies when making a duplicate on film. I assume it has no role in transfer to video.
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