Jump to content


Photo

16mm 7363 ASA


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Jan Doyle

Jan Doyle

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco

Posted 01 July 2007 - 11:02 AM

Hello,

I am interested in shooting 16mm 7363 (hi-con) film in a Bolex outdoors and was wondering if anyone has run test or has experience in the ASA outdoors. I have looked and there seems to be two answers, ASA of 10 if you shoot outdoors and process it reversal or ASA 25 with the same process. I'm leaning towards ASA of 10. Also does anyone know if the ASA changes if you process it Negative. Please if anyone has any experience actually shooting this stock please let me know. Also has anyone experimented with Black & White filters and this stock? Thanks for your help.

Jan

Edited by Jan Doyle, 01 July 2007 - 11:03 AM.

  • 0

#2 Michael Carter

Michael Carter
  • Guests

Posted 01 July 2007 - 03:43 PM

I shot it as 10 asa and Cine Lab in Boston processed it as reversal and it came out great! Now, I told them I'd shot it at 10 first. They knew what to do.
  • 0

#3 Jan Doyle

Jan Doyle

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco

Posted 01 July 2007 - 04:27 PM

Thanks, it was what I imagined. 10ASA. Thanks for taking the time to reply!!!

Anyone with any thoughts about B&W filters. I know it is sensitive to blue in the light spectrum... Thanks again

Jan
  • 0

#4 Kar Wai Ng

Kar Wai Ng
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 127 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Toronto, Canada

Posted 02 July 2007 - 01:05 AM

I shot it at 10 ASA, came out fine in hand-processed reversal. But then again, I developed by inspection (since it's orthochromatic you can use a safelight to develop), but since it's so high-con it's difficult to know if the density is coming from exposure or development. The reversal process also throws in a bunch more factors.

Apparently the suggested speeds outdoors is 6 to 12 ASA, depending on the weather.

With such a slow stock, keep in mind if you're going to use B&W filters, you better have bright sun. With a Red 25 you're looking at an effective ASA/ISO of 1.25! I think it works out to about a T/2 stop following sunny 16 and the bolex shutter+prism compensation.
  • 0

#5 Dominic Case

Dominic Case
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1357 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 02 July 2007 - 02:50 AM

This stock is blue-sensitive ONLY. That means that it is totally un-responsive to green and red light. Sensitivity cuts out at between 500 and 520nm. A WR25 is a red separation filter: it transmits ONLY red light, cutting out just below 600nm. Between the two curves there isn't anything left but a big hole.

So forget about any filter factor (anyway, these are only relevant to panchromatic film). If you use a red 25 filter with this stock you will get zero image at any ASA rating.

In fact there isn't a lot of point using any filters. The emulsion will behave as if you are shooting pan stock through a blue tri-color filter such as a 47.

It is also very high contrast, (with a gamma of about 3, compared with about 0.65 for B/W negative, or 1.2-ish for reversal), so slight variations in exposure will have a dramatic effect on the image you get.

Outdoors is good. You would get a considerable loss of speed in tungsten light as it is so poor in blue light.
  • 0


Opal

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Abel Cine

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Opal

CineLab

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio