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Filmo 70 D, 7285 Ektachrome, and other 16mm questions


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#1 Peter Lee

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Posted 01 July 2007 - 12:40 PM

A friend of mine gave me this EIKI 16mm projector (I put those reels on there just for show, the lamp is burnt out) so I've decided to jump into making 16mm shorts. I've never worked with film before. Another friend of mine is lending me a working Filmo 70 D camera.

I was wondering if making films was easy as loading the camera with film (7285 Ektachrome), filming things outside, sending it off to a lab, then waiting for it to come back and then I can just throw it on the projector. I know I have to watch for light and such, but, stripped down, is it that simple?

Also, how much should 100" of 7285 Ektachrome cost? It's about $50 on Dwayne's Photo and I was wondering if that was a good deal.

And does it really only cost $.24 per foot to process?

Thanks for taking time to read this from a kid who's still got milk behind his ears.
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#2 Herb Montes

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Posted 01 July 2007 - 06:49 PM

I have a manual for the Eiki models RST/RT/RM series. You can get replacement bulbs from Urbanski Film as well as leader and projection reels. You will also want to get a set of rewinds when you shoot enough film to put on bigger reels.

If you're just starting out you many want to start with black & white film like Plus-X. It's cheaper to make mistakes with lower cost stock. Especially if you haven't used film before.

Edited by Herb Montes, 01 July 2007 - 06:50 PM.

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#3 Robert Hughes

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Posted 02 July 2007 - 07:45 PM

A friend of mine gave me this EIKI 16mm projector (I put those reels on there just for show, the lamp is burnt out) so I've decided to jump into making 16mm shorts. I've never worked with film before. Another friend of mine is lending me a working Filmo 70 D camera.

You need to take a look at the sprocket wheels on that camera. Some earlier Filmo's, possibly including the -D model you have, required dual perf film. Later models of Filmo, such as the 70-DA, -DL, -DR, -HL, and -HR all accept single perf or dual perf film. Most film manufactured nowadays is single perf, but you can get dual perf on special order from Kodak.

I was wondering if making films was easy as loading the camera with film (7285 Ektachrome), filming things outside, sending it off to a lab, then waiting for it to come back and then I can just throw it on the projector. I know I have to watch for light and such, but, stripped down, is it that simple?

Pretty much. If you've ever shot 35mm still photos with a camera having manual controls you already have the basic knowledge to run a 16mm film camera. If you've only used a digital POS (point & shoot, of course!), find some dad or other old geezer to give you some pointers. Here's a hint: at 24 frames per second (fps), your shutter speed is about 1/50 second.

Also, how much should 100" of 7285 Ektachrome cost? It's about $50 on Dwayne's Photo and I was wondering if that was a good deal.

That will buy you about 3 minutes of film. You can also buy new film directly from Kodak, and short ends/recans of varying quality off the internet.

And does it really only cost $.24 per foot to process?

some places more, some less.

Thanks for taking time to read this from a kid who's still got milk behind his ears.


Edited by Robert Hughes, 02 July 2007 - 07:48 PM.

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