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shooting 500T at the beach


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#1 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 09:57 PM

I want to go down to the beach this weekend and shoot some surfing, to test out the NPR I just got. My problem is that I have 500T, too fast for daylight, but I do have an 85 filter so at least the color will be alright. What I was thinking about doing is cutting the shutter down to 90 degrees to compensate for not having a ND, or is that a bad idea. I know it will make the motion seem more crisp and choppy, but I think it might look cool for surfing. The other problem is that I don't have a light meter.

Am I really out of luck, or is there a way I can pull it off?

Thanks a lot everybody
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#2 Zamir Merali

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 10:15 PM

500T could actually be helpful to you for shooting surfing. The combination of the 85 filter and the shutter will cut atleast two stops. This will still allow you to shoot at a deep f-stop which means that you won't have to worry about focusing as much.

I think that if you are losing two stops because of your filter and shutter then an exposure of slightly above f-16 will be fine in a sunny beach setting. You could also over expose by a stop and pull in post.
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#3 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 10:55 PM

500T could actually be helpful to you for shooting surfing. The combination of the 85 filter and the shutter will cut atleast two stops. This will still allow you to shoot at a deep f-stop which means that you won't have to worry about focusing as much.

I think that if you are losing two stops because of your filter and shutter then an exposure of slightly above f-16 will be fine in a sunny beach setting. You could also over expose by a stop and pull in post.



This will be the first time I have ever shot film, so please forgive my inexperience... I know that cutting the shutter to 90 will cut 1 stop, so the 85 filter alone will cut another 1 stop? And if I over expose by a stop, "pulling in post" means that the lab will under develop the film slightly?

Also, this is the filter that came with my camera. Is there a way to use a polarizer filter with this 85?

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 10:55 PM

Well, at 50 ASA, in direct sunlight, you are generally at f/16 or slightly over. In backlight, you can open up a stop or two.

So at 500 ASA with an 85, you are at 320 ASA. With a 90 degree shutter angle, at 160 ASA. If you overexpose and pull-process one stop, that's 80 ASA. Overexpose another stop and print down, 40 ASA.

So it's possible, especially as the light drops, or if it's overcast, but it would be better to find some ND's or a Pola if possible.

The 85 filter cuts 2/3's of a stop.

You can stack it with a Pola, or get an 85/Pola combo filter. You can also get 85/ND combos.
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#5 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 11:29 PM

Thanks David, how much would a pola filter cut down? I ask because I would rather stick to filters and in camera adjustments, I don't even know what printing down is. What is it? I think I can manage the over exposing and pulling in post.

One more question, would the image suffer if I stacked the pola filter on the 85, or should i invest in a 85/pola? Would using a 85/pola affect daylight film?

thanks
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 11:55 PM

Pull-processing would be done by the lab.

Printing down just means correcting the overexposure when making a print, put the term is sometimes used to just mean correcting for the overexposure in post color-correcting.

The Pola cuts around a stop and a half, stop and two-thirds, though some people just say two-stops.
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#7 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 11:58 PM

I was thinking it would be nice to have both a 85 and a pola, that way I could use either or both together. Does 85 do anything to day light stock?

Edited by Joshua Dannais, 03 July 2007 - 11:58 PM.

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#8 Ian Marks

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 12:27 AM

I don't know if there's any way I can say this without coming off like a jerk, so I'll apologize in advance. Here goes: save the 500t for low-light shooting buy some slower stock for your surfin' safari. Instead of shooting on the "wrong" stock, put off shooting your test until you're ready to do it right. You'll probably want to invest in some ND's and a maybe a polarizer. And remember that salt air and sand are not good for expensive cameras and lenses.
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#9 Ian Marks

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 12:30 AM

... and I just saw the bit where you said you don't have a light meter.

You're officially not ready to shoot this weekend.
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#10 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 12:56 AM

haha... Yeah I know, It's just that I'm so goddamn anxious to start shooting and I got the film for free, so I thought I might just give it a shot.

are there any good inexpensive light meters I should be looking for?
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#11 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 01:03 AM

Thanks for the apology in advance though, I'm kinda in a rush because I'm having surgery on my foot next week and so I'll probably be on crutches for the rest of the summer.
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#12 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 01:03 AM

I was thinking it would be nice to have both a 85 and a pola, that way I could use either or both together. Does 85 do anything to day light stock?


Adds a lot of orange, just like how it looks.
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#13 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 01:32 AM

I think it would look pretty cool. I found this picture online described as using the "Double 85" effect, this was shot on 500T in daylight... would look pretty sweet if it were surfing. The rest of the article is pretty cool is anybody wants to check it out.

http://images.google...htt...l=en&sa=N

I'm just going to go for it and try a bunch of stuff, see what looks cool and what doesn't. I'll post a link to the results.

thanks to everybody for the advice.
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#14 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 01:41 AM

Does it matter what order filters are stacked? Ex. ploa then 85, or vice versa?
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#15 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 01:52 AM

I found this picture online described as using the "Double 85" effect...


It's pretty much a similar effect that you would get if you were to shoot under tungsten lights with Full CTO over your lights.


Does it matter what order filters are stacked? Ex. ploa then 85, or vice versa?


Depends on your matte box, if you're using one. The rotating filter holder is probably closest to the lens. The difference is probably minimal.
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#16 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:15 AM

yeah, I'm using the circular filters. Cool, well I'll let you guys know how it goes.
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#17 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 03:00 AM

I have 100' of Fuji F-64D. Wanna trade? I'm in Culver City.

And I have a light meter you could maybe use?

Edited by Kenny N Suleimanagich, 04 July 2007 - 03:01 AM.

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#18 Jon Kukla

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 05:29 PM

If it's not too late, I'd also advise to hold off shooting until you've got a lightmeter, unless you have compelling reasons otherwise. Film is too expensive to be used blindly - if things work (or don't work), you're gonna want to know why. Minimizing potential for error is essential. I'm not saying don't experiment - quite the opposite - but there's no point in the exercise if you have no real idea what's going on.
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#19 Ian Marks

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 06:32 PM

If it's not too late, I'd also advise to hold off shooting until you've got a lightmeter, unless you have compelling reasons otherwise. Film is too expensive to be used blindly - if things work (or don't work), you're gonna want to know why. Minimizing potential for error is essential. I'm not saying don't experiment - quite the opposite - but there's no point in the exercise if you have no real idea what's going on.


There... Jon said it better than I could, and again I apologize if I sounded like a jerk. I completely understand wanting to get out there and shoot. I can remember being in high school and shooting a few rolls of Super-8 Kodachrome in a dimly-lit theater situation, even though the needle on the camera's built-in meter was comletely over in the "underexposed" area. I was so anxious to use my new camera (a snazzy Canon 518SV) that I just went ahead and did it and hoped for the best. Needless to say, the film was unusable, and I wasn't able to afford to buy more for quite some time.
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