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How do you prep and clean Super 8 film for video transfer


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#1 foreignfilm

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 10:43 AM

Hi,

I'm new here and thinking about getting a Super 8 video transfer system like Workprinter or Tobin. Most of DIY Super 8 video transfer I saw always has some dirt or specks on it. Are there ways to thoroughly clean the film before transferring so you won't see them at all as if it's a transfer from a professional transfer house? Thanks in advance.
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#2 Robert Hughes

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 10:15 AM

Ask your transfer house to clean & prep the film prior to transfer; most likely they do it anyway. An ultrasonic cleaner is the preferred method.
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#3 Justin Lovell

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 11:20 AM

Also be aware that quality control in processing needs to be as tight, if not tighter on super 8 as every single spec that doesn't get cleaned of properly in the processing. Imperfections will be vastly more noticeable than if it were on a 35mm frame. Like comparing dust mites to golf balls ;)
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 09:26 PM

Also be aware that quality control in processing needs to be as tight, if not tighter on super 8....


Speaking of tight, If you decide to prep the film yourself odds are a movie viewer will not wind up the film tight enough for a rank cintel transfer. The too loosely wound film will actually do a bad thing called cinching as soon as it is placed on a rank cintel and threaded. Cinching is when the film on the supply reel scrapes against the inner winds as it tightens up the too loose film.

Not all ranks have the same tension but nonetheless it's usually best to go for a tight rewind like the kind you get from using actual super-8 rewinds.
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#5 Mike Crane

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 09:39 PM

Spectra products page has most of the editing goodies you'll need if you care to attempt your own film prep: http://spectrafilman...m/Products.html

However, I do not recommend negative film prep! It is nearly impossible to keep it clean as a lab prep room.
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#6 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 01:53 AM

Spectra products page has most of the editing goodies you'll need if you care to attempt your own film prep: http://spectrafilman...m/Products.html

However, I do not recommend negative film prep! It is nearly impossible to keep it clean as a lab prep room.



In general, as Justin said, the best policy with Super8 is to make sure it is clean from the drybox on the film processor and then keep it clean through all of it's handling steps. You can use a anti static lint free "handy" wipe to hand clean the film but this will meet with limited success, especially if the dirt is stuck in the emulsion. There are really only two good ways to clean super 8 thoroughly one is a Lipsner ultrasonic cleaner, the other is to "re-wash" the film, i.e. run it through the film processor again this will soften the emulsion, let any dirt go free in the turbulation of the processor and remove any residual water and kill any growing mold if the film is older.

-Rob-
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#7 foreignfilm

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 05:31 AM

Thanks, folks! :rolleyes:
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