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Film Stock for Super Duper 8


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#1 artschooldropout

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 06:25 PM

I'm planning on filing down my film gate and shooting Super Duper 8 on a music video project coming up. I have a few questions:

I was curious what film stocks are compatible with Super Duper 8? I'm aware that light will be transfered on to the strip on the side of the film that is normally reserved for audio. So I guess I'm asking which film stocks come with this audio strip? I read "Sleep Always" was shot with Kodak Ektachrome 7240 reversal stock. Can I still buy that? Are there alternatives?

Also, I was planning on sending my film to Dwayne?s Photo (http://www.dwaynesphoto.com/) to get it developed. But, they had never developed or even heard of wide screen super 8. Would you all suggest that I send it somewhere that has experience developing super duper 8? If so, any suggestions?


Thank you for you time.

-David
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#2 Nate Downes

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 06:52 PM

Actually, all super8 filmstocks have this area, but unless you do the SD8 mods it goes unused. As a result, every Super8 filmstock will work with SD8.

But the stock used for Sleep Always is no longer made, sad to say. The current alternative is Ektachrome E64T.
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#3 artschooldropout

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 07:49 PM

Alright, thank you for clearing that up for me. I got some misinformation from someone at Dwayne?s photo. Now if someone Could suggest a good lab that know what their talking about, that would be much appreciated.

-David
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#4 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 08:12 PM

Alright, thank you for clearing that up for me. I got some misinformation from someone at Dwayne?s photo. Now if someone Could suggest a good lab that know what their talking about, that would be much appreciated.

-David


As with the film, any lab will do. There is no difference in the processing. It doesn't matter if the lab knows what you are talking about.

Be aware, though, that because super-duper 8 exposes more film than the current equipment was designed for, you may get little scratches in the (formerly) sound area from the processing equipment. Nothing you can do about it at that stage.

What we did for Sleep Always was used a wet gate during the telecine transfer which removed (or more accurately, "made invisible") any little scratches.

In other words, shoot any stock you like and process it anywhere you like. For transfer you have to find a facility that can accomodate the wider frame, and preferabbly they are equipped with a wet gate system. Since we have always done our own transfers I cannot make suggestions about transfer facilities but others here probably can.

Rick
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#5 Trevor Swaim

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 08:25 PM

FSFT.com in seattle is a fab place for super8 transfers
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#6 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 08:42 PM

I realize I should have plugged my friend Mitch's business, since he is equipped for wide frames and wet-gate: www.photoplays.ca
He was the tech mastermind behind Sleep Always.
Rick
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#7 artschooldropout

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 12:25 PM

Thanks for the info Rick. I'm gonna stick with Moonstruck Productions for my telecine. They gave me the far best price for a direct to hard drive uncompressed capture, which is what I've been looking for. When I emailed them in regards to super duper 8 he said "Our transfer machine already has a widened gate, so there will be no problem with the transfer." Should I still ask him about a "wet gate"?

So before I get out the file, I snapped a new pictures. I just want to make sure I know exactly what I'm doing.

I've attached a (somewhat blurry) photo of the inside of my camera. The shiny metal part is the film gate, and I should remove it and file down the left side correct?

Thanks

-David
Filmgate.jpg
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#8 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 07:14 PM

Should I still ask him about a "wet gate"?


I would. You might see some little scratches if you don't.

I've attached a (somewhat blurry) photo of the inside of my camera. The shiny metal part is the film gate, and I should remove it and file down the left side correct?


Correct. File it as far as you can but not too far. You want to maintain the integrity of the structure. Use a very fine file. Keep in mind that I have never done this, I am just going by what my friend Mitch said.
Rick
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#9 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 09:08 PM

A word of advice when shooting SD8:
Unless you want a funky light-streaking effect, avoid hot light sources, such as spot lights, at the top of the frame. Normally a projector masks the frame a little smaller than the actual frame, as a margin of safety. With a super-duper frame the edges of the adjacent frames will appear on the screen (check these photos: http://www.friendlyf...perduper8.html). Now imagine a hot light near the top of your frame. It will also appear at the very bottom of the screen as part of the adjacent frame. This hot light will want to flare up and cast a (possibly unwanted) light streak across the main frame. Even masking during digital editing, which you will have to do (unless you want people to see these frame lines) will not eliminate that light streak.

Rick
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CineTape

Visual Products

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Glidecam

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Opal