Jump to content


Photo

Chinese Lantern Fixture


  • Please log in to reply
28 replies to this topic

#1 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 11 July 2007 - 01:44 AM

People wanted to see what I did, so here ya go, photos & some explanation below:

Basically, I went to the nearest hardware store, got a moderately gauged 25' extension cord, cut off the female end and then measured out 15' and made another cut where I would attach the switch and reconnect the neutral & ground wires inside the 15 amp rated switch box.

Posted Image

I got a 9" piece of threaded lamp rod and a 650w rated ceramic fixture with a screw-in base that fit the rod perfectly.

Posted Image

I ran the wires through the hollow rod, attached them to the fixture and voila! I had a working china ball fixture.

Posted Image

Getting the rod is an excellent way of having a way to attach the lantern to a c-stand, so I would highly recommend it. Once the fixture is clamped onto the c-stand, simply clip on the chinaball and you're done.

Posted Image


Of course, it's a bit more difficult and technical, but pretty straight forward once you have a look around the internet and find some basic examples of wiring.
  • 0

#2 Chayse Irvin

Chayse Irvin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 409 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 11 July 2007 - 02:16 AM

Looks good Jonathan. For ease of use I would clip off the the 15-amp switch. As a lamp op I would throw that thing out of a window if I had to constantly rig it up places. Just attach a male and female AC ends to the switch and you can use it anywhere down the powers path. If you wanted to do lighting cue your lamp op is forced to be within 15ft of the fixture rather then in the eyeline of the object causing the cue.
  • 0

#3 Ken Minehan

Ken Minehan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 168 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Singapore

Posted 11 July 2007 - 02:42 AM

Hi Jonathan. By attaching a ceramic socket, does that allow you to put in a larger wattage bulb? What do you think is the max wattage you can put in with the ceramic socket?
And what is the max wattage before the lantern starts to discolour/burn?

thanks
Ken Minehan
  • 0

#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 11 July 2007 - 02:56 AM

If you use a plastic one, your bulbs will melt it.

The ceramic held up perfectly fine with a 500 watt bulb. I don't plan on using any bulbs higher than that, but the socket itself is rated at 650 watts...even then I could probably push it higher than that and it would hold up for some time.
  • 0

#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 11 July 2007 - 03:00 AM

If you wanted to do lighting cue your lamp op is forced to be within 15ft of the fixture rather then in the eyeline of the object causing the cue.


Good point Chayse, I'll probably make a couple more in the future without the switch and separate lines WITH a switch for the reason you stated.

Thanks!

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 11 July 2007 - 03:03 AM.

  • 0

#6 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 11 July 2007 - 03:07 AM

Actually, I'll probably just get a replacement female plug and swap it with the fixture, then make a switchless cord for fixture as you recommended...

thanks again!
  • 0

#7 Luke Prendergast

Luke Prendergast
  • Sustaining Members
  • 491 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Victoria Australia

Posted 11 July 2007 - 07:55 AM

Bare mains terminals...
  • 0

#8 Richard Andrewski

Richard Andrewski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 134 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Shenzhen, China

Posted 11 July 2007 - 08:39 AM

I get people writing to me from all over the world telling me what they do for DIY solutions. After a recent posting on a board about my wish to make a trombone style lamp harp for chinese lanterns that's adjustable to fit several sizes, one guy from Australia wrote to me showing me his solution. I've enclosed the picture here. Uses a mogul base and threaded rod to allow you to adjust the size. A bit different from my idea but works very well and is easier to implement too. He gave me permission to post it...

Attached Images

  • LampHarp.jpg

Edited by Richard Andrewski, 11 July 2007 - 08:43 AM.

  • 0

#9 Michael Dean Gibbs

Michael Dean Gibbs
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera

Posted 12 July 2007 - 12:37 AM

" Just attach a male and female AC ends to the switch and you can use it anywhere down the powers path."


What exactly do you mean by this Chayse...I'm having trouble picturing this.

Thanks,

mdg
  • 0

#10 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 12 July 2007 - 12:46 AM

" Just attach a male and female AC ends to the switch and you can use it anywhere down the powers path."
What exactly do you mean by this Chayse...I'm having trouble picturing this.

Thanks,

mdg


Rather than actually wire the switchbox in line, wire a plug (male edison) coming out of one side of the box and an outlet (female edison) coming out of the other side.
  • 0

#11 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 12 July 2007 - 02:30 AM

I had some time today, and I was walking past a hardware store, so I figured why not and went ahead and re-attached a female plug to those switch lines, which will come in very handy. And I purchased a pair of extension cords and attached the fixture to those directly, no switch.

Looking at them, the switch lines definitely are much more useful now.

:)

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 12 July 2007 - 02:30 AM.

  • 0

#12 Michael Dean Gibbs

Michael Dean Gibbs
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera

Posted 12 July 2007 - 11:39 AM

Rather than actually wire the switchbox in line, wire a plug (male edison) coming out of one side of the box and an outlet (female edison) coming out of the other side.



Thanks for clairifying that for me Chris! :rolleyes:
  • 0

#13 Michael Dean Gibbs

Michael Dean Gibbs
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera

Posted 12 July 2007 - 11:46 AM

Looking at them, the switch lines definitely are much more useful now.

:)
[/quote]

About how long do you prescribe making this switch-line Jonathan?


mdg
  • 0

#14 JD Hartman

JD Hartman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1690 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Edison, N.J. U.S.A.

Posted 12 July 2007 - 01:16 PM

I'd throw your rig out the window or into the nearest street if I worked on your shoot. The extension cord is run through the lamp pipe and taped into place. Electrical tape is not a replacement for a a proper strain relief. You can be certain the people will carry and attempt to hang your fixture by the cord. The socket you have chosen is not the correct type and the electrically live terminals are exposed. I can also see in the photo that you didn't make an Underwriters knot where the cord exits the lamp pipe.
  • 0

#15 Tim Brown

Tim Brown
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 33 posts
  • Other

Posted 12 July 2007 - 01:31 PM

I'd throw your rig out the window or into the nearest street if I worked on your shoot.


Obviously I concur with everything you've stated, but you have to admire and appreciate the succinctness of "Tri-Staters." :lol:
  • 0

#16 JD Hartman

JD Hartman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1690 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Edison, N.J. U.S.A.

Posted 12 July 2007 - 01:46 PM

Sorry! I was a little harsh. I've been doing electrical work since I was about 12. It is either done right or it presents the possibility of fire or injury. In this case, injury to a member of the crew or cast. It's great to homebrew stuff, but if you are going to use the finished product around people, it has to be done correctly.

Here is a link to a knot which will provide an approved means of strain relef between the lamp pipe and socket: http://www.copper.or...owtorewire.html

Here is a link to a more suitable socket for this purpose: http://www.usahardwa...house/70409.htm
  • 0

#17 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 12 July 2007 - 03:38 PM

No worries JD, any input to make the rigs safer and more professionally constructed is ENCOURAGED

I'm quite green when it comes to slapping together anything electrical, so anymore tips you might have, please feel free to message me and give me any guidance :)

And that screwbase fixture that you provided a link to is the PRECISE one I've been looking for. Just wasn't able to find it anywhere.

THANKS!

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 12 July 2007 - 03:40 PM.

  • 0

#18 JD Hartman

JD Hartman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1690 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Edison, N.J. U.S.A.

Posted 13 July 2007 - 09:58 AM

Home Depot sells them and probably other large home centers, hardware stores and of course your local electrical supply.
  • 0

#19 Phil Gerke

Phil Gerke
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts
  • Sound Department

Posted 13 July 2007 - 03:07 PM

JD

What would be a good strain relief for a rig like this? I'm thinking of making one myself.

Its hard to tell in that illustration of the porcelin socket how it goes together. Is the idea that wire would go through the small circular piece which would then thread into the base?

Great thread by the way. Had to use some plastic sockets recently and it scared the hell out of me. Rated at 60 watts, no good.

Thanks!
  • 0

#20 Richard Andrewski

Richard Andrewski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 134 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Shenzhen, China

Posted 13 July 2007 - 10:56 PM

JD

What would be a good strain relief for a rig like this? I'm thinking of making one myself.

Its hard to tell in that illustration of the porcelin socket how it goes together. Is the idea that wire would go through the small circular piece which would then thread into the base?

Great thread by the way. Had to use some plastic sockets recently and it scared the hell out of me. Rated at 60 watts, no good.

Thanks!


Scroll down to the bottom of this page:

http://www.pendantsy...accessories.htm

They sell the IPON strain reliefs which will fit directly in a 1/8 IP (3/8") threaded hole in the base of one of the porcelain sockets like Jonathan used. These are the really pro solution.

Here is a source for some covered porcelain sockets of various kinds too around page 9 the interesting ones start -- porcelain with a connection cover:

http://www.lightingp...lerpdf/1-50.pdf

And they have others including mogul ones as well. Most are rated 660w / 250v. Just get one with an 1/8 IP to go with your IPON strain relief and you've got a super clean unit that no one will want to throw out the window!
  • 0


Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

CineLab

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Opal

The Slider

Technodolly

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

CineTape

FJS International, LLC