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Tugsten and Outdoor Light In Same Scene.


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#1 anthony derose

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 02:18 PM

In a situation where you have windows letting in daylight and the scene is also light by tugsten lights will the frame be blueish? An example of such a scene I'm talking about, can be one in a class room.

I know you could gel the windows to match the tugsten or the tugsten lights to match the daylight. But in a case where you have no gels or not enough, how should you go about solving this problem? Will the light coming in from the window be blue while the tugsten light is correct?

I guess ways of dealing with this is not to frame near the window or almost block the light out with blinds or curtins. Any other suggestions would be appreciated.

THANKS YOU
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#2 David Bradley

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 03:25 PM

Assuming your using a video camera you first have to establish a colour temperature for the scene by manipulating the in camera white balance. Gelling your tungsten lights is generally easier than gelling the windows but by the sounds of it you don't have any gels so here is an alternative or two.

The average colour temperature in Kelvin of daylight is somewhere around '5600K', generally tungsten lights are around '3200K' (the higher the number the bluer the light) so YES the scene will appear abnormally blue if your camera is white balanced for tungsten or it will look too warm (red) if balanced for day light.

One alternative considering you don't have gels (which by the way aren't that costly) is waiting until night and beaming your tungsten lamps through the windows thus mimicking daylight. In this scenario you would balance the camera to 3200K and you wouldn't have to worry too much about variations in colour temperature.

Another alternative is as you suggested, to frame away from the window, flag (block) all of the daylight coming through the windows (heavy curtains should do) and light the scene accordingly.

Ideally you want to invest in some gels/diffusion/reflectors etc. If your considering lighting/camera as a career then the only way to learn is by doing.

Hope this helps and doesn't sound too patronising.

Best

David
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#3 anthony derose

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 03:53 PM

Thanks,

I'm actually talking about film. Like a 7212 or 7217 type stock, I assume that method could work. If I want to show that there is a window can I get away with maybe showing a portion of it, even if the outside was blue because of the different color temps. if it doesn't destroy the shot I don't mind.
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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 04:12 PM

Much depends on how much daylight as against tungsten light there is. I've filmed quite a few times in classrooms where the tungsten lights are on with daylight coming in and colourwise the scene was mostly daylight. The tungstens were just giving a small amount of warm fill.
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#5 Robert Hughes

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 12:33 PM

A few months back I was assisting at a mixed light video interview; the camera op hung 1/2 blue (or CTB) stage gels over his tungsten Lowell lights and any tungsten practicals in the shot; the white balance was set for outdoors and the scene looked fine. With color negative film the effect should be similar.

Edited by Robert Hughes, 14 July 2007 - 12:36 PM.

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