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Permission to use location


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#1 Douglas Sunlin

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 12:35 PM

Greetings all.

I'll be taping a short fan film this year (my first) and I have a simple question.

The locations that would be ideal for this shoot would be on the grounds of a university, as well as a semi-public garden.

I know that it's easier to get forgiveness than permission, but I want to do this clean and legal, just for the fun of it.

Seriously, what would be some smart tactics for presenting the project, who should I ask for permission; how would I put my best foot forward?

Since I don't technically have a "studio" would it be deceitful to create a website for the project and business card for "Studio Guignol"? Would it matter in terms of getting permission?

Thanks a bunch for any and all of your ideas!
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 02:09 PM

Usually the method is is be up front. Tell them a bit of background to the film, it's rare that people would want to check the script. Inform them where you wish to film, what you're filming, what facilities (e.g. power, access for vehicles etc.) you need and how long the filming will take. Don't bluff about the length of time you require, it'll just annoy them if you seriously overrun, be realistic

If you're friendly and act in a professional manner, you'll be surprised where you can get permission to film. If you don't have a big budget, let them know that you can't afford location fees. We managed to shoot a short film inside a major regional airport for nothing. Allow them to feel part of the project and offer them a credit for the use of the location.

There's a model location contract that they should sign.
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#3 Kieran Scannell

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 02:10 PM

Douglas.

It's simple common courtesy to ask permission to film on private property. How would you feel if one morning you wake up and
a film crew are shooting in your front garden? If your serious about film making then you should be serious about aquiring locations.
Do it properly, you might find people are more helpful than you think!

Good luck.

Kieran.

Edited by Kieran Scannell, 15 July 2007 - 02:14 PM.

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#4 Douglas Sunlin

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 02:46 PM

I am certainly going to ask. Don't know who to ask. Perhaps I should inquire at the film department of the university.
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#5 Kieran Scannell

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 02:54 PM

Assuming they have a film department! but they must have have some kind of communication, media, marketing, department.
That's the way to go. Just follow Brian's guidelines (1 minute later and i wouldn't have needed to post!) and you should be OK.

Kieran.
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#6 Mark Bonnington

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 01:50 AM

There's a model location contract that they should sign.

Who's the person that needs to sign this? In an educational setting, does it have to be the president of the school or can it be someone lower on the totem pole?
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#7 JD Hartman

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 10:20 AM

The first stop in you journey to get permission should be the university's Public Safety, Security or "Rent a Cop" department. They should be able to guide you in the steps necessary to gain permission.
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#8 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 10:49 AM

Hi,

I tend not to try and guess who I should approach - instead, I tend to try and get in touch with the highest level person possible. Even if they're a bit confused and put you on to someone else, at least the request is then going down not up. Works much better, and the more responsible someone is, the more open they are free to be.

A year or so ago I managed to get permission to shoot in a church and a movie theatre in Los Angeles, by email, from here. I quite enjoy location management.

Phil
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#9 Jim Simon

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Posted 19 July 2007 - 10:38 PM

A University is likely to have a Public Affairs department. They'll be the correct first contact, and they can guide you to the right folks from there.
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#10 Douglas Sunlin

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Posted 20 July 2007 - 12:40 PM

A University is likely to have a Public Affairs department. They'll be the correct first contact, and they can guide you to the right folks from there.

Ah yes, the sensible approach. Never thought of that for some strange reason. ;) Thanks.
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