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Best Camera for a marine fishing boat


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#1 Michael Collier

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 10:19 PM

I am putting together a pitch for shooting on a crab fishing boat, and I am working the budget. What camera would be ideal for this situation? I need a 35mm camera with 400' mags, lightweight, easy to load (easy as possible, it will be on the rough sea), small enough that I can stay out of the way, and easy to handhold. Sync sound is not an issue, we'll be shooting HD for anything that needs sync sound recorded. Also price is an issue, since I will be out for probably two to three weeks. Is there something best for this situation? Also what considerations should I have for all the salty humid air (open ocean fishing vessel). Obviously lots of plastic on the camera, but is there anything that I am missing?

I am leaning towards the 235, though that camera is a little too expensive, and I would end up shooting less film if I went that route (I would shoulder extra weight to shoot more footage) Would a 35-3 fit the bill? It looks a little large, and probably not as compact as I would like, but the price is right.

Ahhhhh, if only there was a camera in the price, weight and size range of the A-minima, things would be easier.
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 10:29 PM

I think this is a job for an aaton.
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#3 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 19 July 2007 - 03:17 AM

I am putting together a pitch for shooting on a crab fishing boat, and I am working the budget. What camera would be ideal for this situation? I need a 35mm camera with 400' mags, lightweight, easy to load (easy as possible, it will be on the rough sea), small enough that I can stay out of the way, and easy to handhold. Sync sound is not an issue, we'll be shooting HD for anything that needs sync sound recorded. Also price is an issue, since I will be out for probably two to three weeks. Is there something best for this situation? Also what considerations should I have for all the salty humid air (open ocean fishing vessel). Obviously lots of plastic on the camera, but is there anything that I am missing?

I am leaning towards the 235, though that camera is a little too expensive, and I would end up shooting less film if I went that route (I would shoulder extra weight to shoot more footage) Would a 35-3 fit the bill? It looks a little large, and probably not as compact as I would like, but the price is right.

Ahhhhh, if only there was a camera in the price, weight and size range of the A-minima, things would be easier.

I had experience of repair Kinor-35 H after sea shooting ( Black Sea )and see, what effect had salty humid air on body and electronics. This was long time shooting.
I think, after long time sea shooting, the camera can turn into scrap metal.

You need super reliable cine camera with minimum electronics.
The underwater box can protect camera from any, but, this is big size and weight device.
I can recommend to draw attention on old russian Konvas -1 with rheostat motor.
The rheostat motor don't have any electronics and will work at any condition, need good battery only.
This is type of motor can problem with contacts only.
The better idea, to use of Konvas-2M with rheostat motor or with other motor with full waterproof speed control module.
Will need clean camera and lenses after every shooting, because, salty water can influence on MC of lens too.
The any water protection soft cover not protect of camera from salty humid air on 100%.
Possible, you need create of soft rubber blimp for full camera ( similar of diving-suit with one hole only ).
Any case, you need spare equipments for shooting too.

From other side, Konvas cameras have 200ft magazines. From one side, the rewind of film from 400 ft on 200 ft rolls a some discomfort, but, you will have camera with less weight and size and can shoot of great takes at handheld positions.

Konvas have low price and you can take a few cameras.
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#4 Stephen Murphy

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Posted 19 July 2007 - 04:02 AM

If price is an issue try a Moviecam SL. Its a great camera, extremely lightweight and since the release of the arricams its rental rates have droped substantialy. I was never a fan of the aaton 35-3.
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#5 Michael Collier

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Posted 20 July 2007 - 09:27 PM

Thanks for the advice. I will check out those cameras. It sounds like my options now are to rent a Moviecam SL or buy a Konvas 2M (haven't seen those on the rental shelves at any shop close to me). On either camera I think I will invest in a few extra parts, just incase, and sell those off if they are not needed. Lubing the damn thing in the high seas sounds like it will be challenging. I just have an image in my head of a grey sea swelling over the deck in slowmotion, as crabpots come crashing slowly, and it gets me really really excited.

I think I will be calling the production offices of 'Deadliest Catch' and see if I can get some advice from them about keeping cameras safe. I definatley will watch the show much more closely.

Also on monday, I will find out what insurance for this shoot will cost....and am preparing myself for a very very large number.
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 20 July 2007 - 09:40 PM

Thanks for the advice. I will check out those cameras. It sounds like my options now are to rent a Moviecam SL or buy a Konvas 2M (haven't seen those on the rental shelves at any shop close to me). On either camera I think I will invest in a few extra parts, just incase, and sell those off if they are not needed. Lubing the damn thing in the high seas sounds like it will be challenging. I just have an image in my head of a grey sea swelling over the deck in slowmotion, as crabpots come crashing slowly, and it gets me really really excited.

I think I will be calling the production offices of 'Deadliest Catch' and see if I can get some advice from them about keeping cameras safe. I definatley will watch the show much more closely.

Also on monday, I will find out what insurance for this shoot will cost....and am preparing myself for a very very large number.


With interest I watched The Deadliest Catch for the shows that were their behind the scenes episodes. You wont like this but thay only protected their handheld cameras with shelters made from plastic bags and tape. They also mentioned that they will totally destroy about 60 cameras per season.
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#7 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 21 July 2007 - 08:04 AM

Thanks for the advice. I will check out those cameras. It sounds like my options now are to rent a Moviecam SL or buy a Konvas 2M (haven't seen those on the rental shelves at any shop close to me).


If you will need additional information about Konvas-2M and russian lenses, i will be happy to help.
I wish underline, The every standard camera must be modify for sea shooting.
This must be ( first level ) sealing of body, magazine, motor and ( second level ) the additional outside insulated enclosure.
And all electronics system must have special editions with liquid resin molding, and need a spare electronic modules.

The plastic bags and tape can protect on very short time and without full protection.
This is serious project and equipments must have special preparation.

If you will need additional information about Konvas-2M and russian lenses, i will be glad to help.
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#8 Michael Collier

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 09:26 PM

I would love more info on Konvas. Also I would love info on how to protect the cameras. i had heard that DC goes through 60 cameras per episode...not a tally I would like to follow. For now when I fill out insurance papers to rent gear, I get to skip the box explianing any claims I have, I would like to keep it that way. I am actually more concerned with the HD camera. I will have to come up with something. Good news is when the seas are rough and no real fishing is going on, I can shut down the cameras. But if the seas are rough and they are pulling crab pots up, time to rig up and get the shot.

What other things can I do to keep the cameras safe? It seems like I would have to put underwater housings on them, but thats very restrictive in terms of shooting. Are there any rental houses that specialize in renting cameras ready to shoot on the open seas?
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