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Will Dwaynes Process Sound Kodachrome


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#1 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 21 July 2007 - 09:27 PM

I've been given some old kodachrome sound film to sell. It's been refrigerated the entire time. Does Dwaynes process Kodachrome sound film?
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#2 Michael Waite

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Posted 21 July 2007 - 10:20 PM

I'm sure they can, as long as it's not one of the old, obscure stocks like II that required different chemistry. I know someone who wants to do a project with Super 8 sound, so please let me know the age of this stock, how many & price, thanks.
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#3 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 21 July 2007 - 10:58 PM

I'm sure they can, as long as it's not one of the old, obscure stocks like II that required different chemistry. I know someone who wants to do a project with Super 8 sound, so please let me know the age of this stock, how many & price, thanks.


I know the person and if he says they have been in the fridge the whole time I believe him. lol, I actually recall him mentioning he had this film, refrigerated, several times over the past 10 years at least. The film has an expiration date of 4-1987.

There are 3 Kodachrome 40's and one Ektachrome 160 sound color film, Type A.

If your friend wants to just buy one first and see how it comes out I would hold the other two. I'll sell them for 15 dollars each.
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#4 Terry Mester

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Posted 21 July 2007 - 11:52 PM

Does Dwaynes process Kodachrome sound film?

As of about six months ago, yes they will. Call them: 1-800-522-3940 / 620-421-3940.
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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 03:54 AM

The Ektachrome is another matter. It's an obsolete process and so would have to go to Rocky Mountain and wait in the queue. I had to do it 5 years ago- the stock was already 5 years old, so I checked with Kodak before shooting. They said it was fine, so I went ahead, but the envelope then came back saying sorry, they'd discontinued the process. Had I known before hand I probably wouldn't have used it. Kodak used to charge £5, Rocky mountain charged about £15. I don't think they'd even promise to get images off a film that old. Twenty- year old film isn't worth money. Not even K40.
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#6 Robert Hughes

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 09:09 AM

If you really want to use that Ektachrome you can process it at home as b&w negative, but I believe it has the antihalation backing so you'll want to prewash the film to remove it prior to running through the developer.
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#7 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 03:26 PM

Twenty- year old film isn't worth money. Not even K40.


You neglected to mention refrigerated. Does that make a difference?
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#8 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 08:00 PM

I can make this more interesting.

I have a fourth kodachrome cartridge that is silent, just as old, and was also refrigerated. I'd be willing to shoot it and have Dwayne's develop it. lol, but if it comes out fine, than I'm out 20 bucks because these days I'm shooting other film stocks.

So, would the peanut gallery be willing to back their opinion and reimburse me the 25 bucks it costs for processing and shipping back and forth IF the film comes out fine? If the answer is no, then the peanut gallery just has an opinion without any risk. If the film does not come out fine, then I spent 25 bucks and the peanut gallery is vindicated.
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#9 Terry Mester

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 08:22 PM

You neglected to mention refrigerated. Does that make a difference?

Yes, refrigeration makes a difference. However, at $15 you want way too much money. NEW K40 Cartridges sold here in Canada for $24 CDN, and Ektachrome Carts sold for $13 CDN. You should be selling these 20-year-old Carts for $5. Con/Pro8mm must be affecting your thinking!
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#10 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 10:24 PM

Yes, refrigeration makes a difference. However, at $15 you want way too much money. NEW K40 Cartridges sold here in Canada for $24 CDN, and Ektachrome Carts sold for $13 CDN. You should be selling these 20-year-old Carts for $5. Con/Pro8mm must be affecting your thinking!


As I recall you were the one who claimed a 10 percent mark up for companies that load their own super-8 film cartridges would be plenty.

Super-8 sound cartridges haven't been made in ten years so if someone wants to use Kodachrome sound cartridges there are very limited sources to get the sound cartridges from, and when one factors in that they have been refrigerated all of these years that makes them less of a risk than non-refrigerated stock.

lol, five bucks wouldn't even cover the cost of electricity to keep the cartridges refrigerated for all of these years.

-----------------------------------------

Here is a completed auction...

http://cgi.ebay.com/...1QQcmdZViewItem

3 sound kodachrome cartridges from 1979, 28 years ago, that sold for 45 bucks.

My deal was more generous than that one, the film is 8 years newer, was refrigerated from the beginning, not just the last five years as was mentioned in the auction, and I offered to sell only one and then hold the other two until they could shoot the first one and see how it came out.

Some sellers have opening bids of 19.99 for one sound kodachrome cartridges and "buy it now" prices of 49 bucks per sound cartridge just in case someone out there really wants it and needs it right away.
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#11 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 11:01 PM

Yes, refrigeration makes a difference. However, at $15 you want way too much money. NEW K40 Cartridges sold here in Canada for $24 CDN, and Ektachrome Carts sold for $13 CDN. You should be selling these 20-year-old Carts for $5. Con/Pro8mm must be affecting your thinking!


I don't understand your pricing nor how it relates, Ektachrome has always been more expensive than Kodachrome.
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#12 Mark Dunn

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 03:39 AM

I think the difference is that Kodak isn't allowed to sell process paid film in the USA- but it is-and does-elsewhere, including, presumably, Canada. (This surprised me when I bought Kodachrome in the US- the one-or two- day service was nice, though.)
Ektachrome is always sold without processing, so in a 'process-paid-allowed' country the upfront price is always less.

I don't know what a peanut gallery is. I was just offering an opinion on very old colour film. Perhaps I should clarify and say it isn't worth MY money. It might be worth processing, it's just not worth shooting.
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#13 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 05:32 AM

I think the difference is that Kodak isn't allowed to sell process paid film in the USA- but it is-and does-elsewhere, including, presumably, Canada. (This surprised me when I bought Kodachrome in the US- the one-or two- day service was nice, though.)
Ektachrome is always sold without processing, so in a 'process-paid-allowed' country the upfront price is always less.

I don't know what a peanut gallery is. I was just offering an opinion on very old colour film. Perhaps I should clarify and say it isn't worth MY money. It might be worth processing, it's just not worth shooting.


Peanut gallery means a comment from the "gallery". I'm just teasing you into stepping up to the plate. You may be right in your opinion, but if I were to test the one remaining kodachrome cartridge I have to verify the film is good, and it is good, or acceptable, I'll have to raise the sell price to offset the cost of the test.

In this particular instance, your third party opinion that you stated as fact causes others to either put up or shut up, yet what is the risk to you?

So I would be willing to sell the film for 15 bucks as is, OR, I will test one cartridge, and if the film is fine, then I would have to raise the price to 25 bucks a cartridge to make up the cost.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Based on your claim that the film is not worth shooting, I will expand the sale conditions to include the following, (shipping extra).

15 bucks per cartridge untested, or I'll test the fourth, silent Kodachrome cartridge first and if the film comes out acceptably, then the three remaining kodachrome sound cartridge prices jump to 25 bucks per cartridge to absorb the testing costs, and if the film test reveals the film is not worth shooting, I won't sell the film at all.

The above should satisfy all the concerns about the film, no?
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#14 Terry Mester

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 05:42 PM

3 sound kodachrome cartridges from 1979, 28 years ago, that sold for 45 bucks.

My deal was more generous than that one, the film is 8 years newer, was refrigerated from the beginning, not just the last five years as was mentioned in the auction, and I offered to sell only one and then hold the other two until they could shoot the first one and see how it came out.

Some sellers have opening bids of 19.99 for one sound kodachrome cartridges and "buy it now" prices of 49 bucks per sound cartridge just in case someone out there really wants it and needs it right away.


Well, if they're selling for that much on E-bay, then that would be a fair pricing standard to use. The Kodachrome Film is longer-lasting than Ektachrome, and would be worth more. I guess your original idea of letting the buyer try one Cartridge is fair enough. Perhaps it would be preferable to offer the buyer a 75% refund on any Carts that didn't turn out. This would make it easier for you to sell them for the full going E-bay price, and provides protection to the buyer. If they were refrigerated, I think that they'll all develop fine. However, are you sure that the E160 is not Type G? The old used Cart I have is E160 G. Perhaps that's the obsolete Ektachrome process Mark was referring to.

I don't understand your pricing nor how it relates, Ektachrome has always been more expensive than Kodachrome.


The $24 Silent Kodachrome price in Canada included processing. I didn't know that processing wasn't included in the U.S. Processing for Ektachrome would have cost about another $13 totalling $26. I think Ektachrome would have cost more money because Kodak sold less of it.

Remember that a Film was manufactured about 2 years prior to its expiration date.
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#15 Terry Mester

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 07:55 PM

Alessandro, did you check if the Ektachrome Cart is Type G or A? If it's G, the developing Process is EM-26. You can call Kodak to see if they still make that developer chemical. If not, don't throw the Cart out -- give it to a Lab who can at least reclaim the valuable Silver.
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#16 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 03:20 PM

Alessandro, did you check if the Ektachrome Cart is Type G or A? If it's G, the developing Process is EM-26. You can call Kodak to see if they still make that developer chemical. If not, don't throw the Cart out -- give it to a Lab who can at least reclaim the valuable Silver.


It 's ektachrome sound, type A, expiration date is 03/1987.
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#17 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 07:09 AM

http://cgi.ebay.com/...E:B:DBS:US:1123

I just saw one Kodachrome sound cartridge of film is already up to 54.40. Granted it is probably from one of the last batches of Kodachrome sound film ever made as it is dated from around 1997 so it is a lot newer than what I was selling, but but 54 bucks is still a lot more than my per cartridge price.
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#18 Michael Waite

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 09:09 AM

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...E:B:DBS:US:1123

I just saw one Kodachrome sound cartridge of film is already up to 54.40. Granted it is probably from one of the last batches of Kodachrome sound film ever made as it is dated from around 1997 so it is a lot newer than what I was selling, but but 54 bucks is still a lot more than my per cartridge price.

I've learned not to place too much reliance on ebay as a price guide. You'll see an item sell for $50 & then an identical one will sell for $10 a week later.
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#19 Mark Dunn

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 10:59 AM

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...E:B:DBS:US:1123

I just saw one Kodachrome sound cartridge of film is already up to 54.40. Granted it is probably from one of the last batches of Kodachrome sound film ever made as it is dated from around 1997 so it is a lot newer than what I was selling, but but 54 bucks is still a lot more than my per cartridge price.


That is a fairly impressive price. Perhaps some collector wants to own 'the last K40 sound cartridge' or whatever. I'd be happy using my own 10-year-old film, but that's because I know it's been in the freezer since it was bought. I know I could only sell it for pennies, if it got a bid at all.
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#20 david savetsky

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 11:08 AM

For those interested, i have ELA 594 Ecktachrome 50 FT SOUND CARTS manufactured in the late 90's by kodak and tested (results available) Processing available thru FILM RESCUE. These carts were the last ones made by kodak and are being sold for $25 each. They have been FROZEN since manufacture .FILMMAKERS who used this stock and processed it are available to discuss their results.If you are serious in using sound film that is not of questionable quality call dave at triple s studios 9 am to 9pm EST M-F AT 1800 806 6808
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