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When shooting 35mm never to be projected, is anything done differently?


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#1 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 04:16 PM

I was wondering when say an episodic television show that shoots in 35mm.
but knows that it never, ever, is going to have a film print to be projected, does
that affect shooting and editing? For example, do shows ever shoot at 29.97 to
make some things easier or, in NLEs, is editing done differently than if an negative
cut list had to be made?

I imagine that there might be some lighting changes due to the differences
between watching a televison and watching a film projected in a darkened room
but for t.v. or sure to be straight to video that do shoot in 35mm., do you know
of any technical differences in shooting and editing? Thanks.
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#2 John Sprung

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 05:11 PM

29.97 is almost never done, because it renders the product unmarketable in the PAL/SECAM world. That's why we have 24p HD tape formats, and 24p digital cameras. We save the uncut negative and a cut list, not so much in case they want to cut it in the future, but for a potential re-transfer to some better future TV system.

The big difference is 3 perf, it's pretty much universally used. You may get some 4 perf for special effects, inserts, or stock shots. No problem mixing them after they come out of telecine.



-- J.S.
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#3 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 06:20 PM

29.97 is almost never done, because it renders the product unmarketable in the PAL/SECAM world. That's why we have 24p HD tape formats, and 24p digital cameras. We save the uncut negative and a cut list, not so much in case they want to cut it in the future, but for a potential re-transfer to some better future TV system.

The big difference is 3 perf, it's pretty much universally used. You may get some 4 perf for special effects, inserts, or stock shots. No problem mixing them after they come out of telecine.
-- J.S.



Thanks. 29.97 "almost never done...PAL/SECAM" seems so obvious now that you say it. I haven't shot
any film for episodic t.v. shows but I think I got the idea from some music video guys who wanted to
do that (quite a while back though.)

So, would you say "Law and Order", "E.R." and other big shows are all likely 3 perf.?
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#4 John Sprung

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 01:07 PM

So, would you say "Law and Order", "E.R." and other big shows are all likely 3 perf.?

It's hard enough remembering my own shows, let alone the other guys' -- but yes, most likely if film, then 3 perf.



-- J.S.
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#5 Jon Kukla

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 01:41 PM

Also almost always shot Super 35 whether 3 or 4 perf - there's no need to reserve space for a married print soundtrack.
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#6 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 11:28 PM

Also almost always shot Super 35 whether 3 or 4 perf - there's no need to reserve space for a married print soundtrack.


Hmm, thanks!
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Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

CineLab

Metropolis Post