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From HDV to 35mm


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#1 Agustin Oroz

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 06:57 PM

I looking for a hdv cam that will give me the best resoult when i blow up the film to 35mm

I´ve heard that the panasonics are the best option and i should avoid the sonys. I don´t really know why and if it is correct!

Thanks for the help.

A.
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#2 Nate Downes

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 09:50 PM

Well, Panasonic doesn't make any HDV cameras, that's why they're better. They offer a P2 based system, which is single-frame stored verses interpolation of frames which makes transfer to anything bad.

Frankly, shooting anything digitally for transfer to film is not the best option in most cases. Costs more than just shooting it on film to begin with in my experience.
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#3 Scott Fritzshall

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 01:20 AM

If you've got the money for a filmout, how do you not have the money for a better camera? It seems like a lot of people ask this sort of question hypothetically, because they would like to have a filmout, but I'm pretty sure that 99% of them never end up being able to afford it anyway. Really, there are many other things you should be considering when deciding on your camera.
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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 01:14 PM

People have successfully used the JVC HD 100 series for film out. Although putting a decent lens on would really improve the quality over the stock zoom lens, you also have the option of the improved 200/250 series.

Moving up to higher quality cameras would improve results. The XDCAM HD cameras are better.
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#5 Nate Downes

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 06:14 PM

People have successfully used the JVC HD 100 series for film out. Although putting a decent lens on would really improve the quality over the stock zoom lens, you also have the option of the improved 200/250 series.

Moving up to higher quality cameras would improve results. The XDCAM HD cameras are better.

While yes, you *can* do a film-out, the quality is less than ideal, and the cost is incredible. You could have bought a Varicam for the price of each film-out copy, and you will likely need 3-4 to get it right. And that's not counting the interim steps for sound, interneg, etc. All in all, to bring your HDV footage to film will likely run into the hundreds of thousands
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#6 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 06:42 AM

While yes, you *can* do a film-out, the quality is less than ideal, and the cost is incredible. You could have bought a Varicam for the price of each film-out copy, and you will likely need 3-4 to get it right. And that's not counting the interim steps for sound, interneg, etc. All in all, to bring your HDV footage to film will likely run into the hundreds of thousands


Better to let the disturbor handle such costs, there's little point in doing this with a long form film. For a producer, it's only really worth considering a film out for something like a short.

A Cinevator transfer would cut the costs for one or two prints, but it's lower quality than the more expensive options. Although it's OK on HDCAM, I couldn't say for HDV, but might be worth a test if anyone is considering it.
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#7 Agustin Oroz

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 09:58 AM

If you've got the money for a filmout, how do you not have the money for a better camera? It seems like a lot of people ask this sort of question hypothetically, because they would like to have a filmout, but I'm pretty sure that 99% of them never end up being able to afford it anyway. Really, there are many other things you should be considering when deciding on your camera.




Well, in this case is 99% sure that we are gonna make the filmout. Unfortunately i don´t have the final decision of the format.
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#8 Agustin Oroz

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 10:12 AM

People have successfully used the JVC HD 100 series for film out. Although putting a decent lens on would really improve the quality over the stock zoom lens, you also have the option of the improved 200/250 series.

Moving up to higher quality cameras would improve results. The XDCAM HD cameras are better.


Thanks brian; ill look for them

Would i need any adaptor to add better lenses?
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#9 Agustin Oroz

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 10:26 AM

Better to let the disturbor handle such costs, there's little point in doing this with a long form film. For a producer, it's only really worth considering a film out for something like a short.

A Cinevator transfer would cut the costs for one or two prints, but it's lower quality than the more expensive options. Although it's OK on HDCAM, I couldn't say for HDV, but might be worth a test if anyone is considering it.



I´m absolutely agree with you about the cost of the film out and the quality i´m gonna have. The thing is that as a documentary, we are gonna spend a lot of material and until now we can afford that amount of material in other format.
Thanks again and i´ll try to get a better camera, if not... i better satart making test.

A.
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#10 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 10:30 AM



Thanks brian; ill look for them

Would i need any adaptor to add better lenses?


The JVCs have a lens mount so you can change lenses. You can read Walter Graff's comments on the 17 X with the HD 200 here: http://www.cinematog...showtopic=22106

The JVC has also a PL mount adapter that allows you to use 16mm film camera lenses. It doesn't have use ground glass and the results I've seen online look pretty impressive.
http://www.cinematog...showtopic=22736

It's a good idea to run a test with your lab before making final decisions.
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#11 Scott Fritzshall

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 11:28 AM

I´m absolutely agree with you about the cost of the film out and the quality i´m gonna have. The thing is that as a documentary, we are gonna spend a lot of material and until now we can afford that amount of material in other format.
Thanks again and i´ll try to get a better camera, if not... i better satart making test.

A.

Ah, that makes more sense. The fact that it's a documentary changes things quite a bit. Look into XDCamHD, it's basically HDV with a higher bitrate, and the cameras have bigger sensors and better lenses. For what it's worth, I've seen material from a first-generation JVC HDV camera that was filmed out, and it looked ok. Better than I was expecting, but then again I wasn't expecting much. Worst-case scenario is, it's a documentary and no one really cares if your image doesn't look that good (except for you, of course).

I'd stay away from lens adapters if you're doing run-and-gun style shooting, as those tend to be bulky and fragile, and also cost you light in situations where you can't afford it. If you're shooting talking-head material, you might decide to use one for aesthetic reasons.

Be really sure to test out whatever you're going to be using, especially for run-and-gun. I held a JVC HD100 for a bit and found it to be very uncomfortable; its handgrip made me turn my wrist outward. A true ENG style camera will make holding it for long situations much more pleasant, especially compared to palmcorder-style cameras like the HVX. If you got one of those, you'd really want some accessories to let you shoulder mount it.
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