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Frank Zappa's "200 Motels" (1971)


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#1 John Sprung

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 01:47 PM

I've heard conflicting reports that it was either an experimental 1000 line video system, or plain old (actually then brand new) PAL. Does anybody know for sure?


Thanks --



-- J.S.
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#2 Marc Alucard

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 05:17 PM

I've heard conflicting reports that it was either an experimental 1000 line video system, or plain old (actually then brand new) PAL. Does anybody know for sure?
Thanks --
-- J.S.



I'm pretty sure it was taped in PAL.

I wish it would be released on DVD at some time.
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#3 Marc Alucard

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 05:51 PM

I saw it on film.
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#4 Christian Appelt

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 02:31 PM

IIRC it was shot on 1" open reel PAL video and recorded to 35mm. I cannot find the 1970s article (A.C. or Filmmaker's Newsletter?) where the process was explained.
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#5 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 02:28 PM

IIRC it was shot on 1" open reel PAL video and recorded to 35mm. I cannot find the 1970s article (A.C. or Filmmaker's Newsletter?) where the process was explained.


The Xfer to film used the Technicolor Vidtronics process, though that could just be the name of the Technicolor unit doing the work.
Not much in Webdom about it though:


It's b1971 - 200 Motels by Frank Zappa and The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler were the first feature films shot entirely on color videotape and transferred to film by Technicolor's Vidtronics unit under Joseph Bluth.

http://history.sandi...elevision3.html

By 1969, it was clear that electronic capture would have to work in color to have a future in theaters. Sargent and several other producers planned films that would be shot using color videotape. Then a very early tape-to-film would be created. In 1969, Technicolor, always on the vanguard, formed Vidtronics to service producers' color tape-to-film needs. Their process used an old kinescope-like technique to create three black-and-white kinescope separation masters, which could then be printed using the dye transfer technique they used for regular features. A few years later Vidtronics unceremoniously closed down.

http://digitalconten...eo_hail_oracle/
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