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7218 Overexposure


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#1 Allyn Laing

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 04:47 PM

Hello,

Probably already answered in other threads, and a common question, so if someone can point me to one that would be perfect but...

How far can you overexpose this negative before it looses its detail? I have heard of overexposure so that you can crush it later but I am wondering how far can you go with this particular method before it falls apart.

Allyn.
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 07:10 PM

Hello,

Probably already answered in other threads, and a common question, so if someone can point me to one that would be perfect but...

How far can you overexpose this negative before it looses its detail? I have heard of overexposure so that you can crush it later but I am wondering how far can you go with this particular method before it falls apart.

Allyn.


Well, things can be 5 and more stops hot before they lose all detail. Overexposure to tighten up grain usually isn't that much. I like 2/3 of a stop myself.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 07:37 PM

Well, things can be 5 and more stops hot before they lose all detail. Overexposure to tighten up grain usually isn't that much. I like 2/3 of a stop myself.



Look at the sensitometric curve published by Kodak. As long as scene content is not falling on the flat "D-Max" of the curve, the film is still recording highlight "detail". And 7218 has a very long straight line portion, and gentle shoulder roll off, that can capture highlights that are overexposed by 4, 5, or more stops. Of course, the negative is becoming very dense, and will need extra light to print or transfer through the added density.
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#4 Allyn Laing

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 11:30 PM

Hello,

Probably already answered in other threads, and a common question, so if someone can point me to one that would be perfect but...

How far can you overexpose this negative before it looses its detail? I have heard of overexposure so that you can crush it later but I am wondering how far can you go with this particular method before it falls apart.

Allyn.



Yes this is what i'm talking about, do you have any examples of 2/3rds over - the final image? Simple I know
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#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 02:26 AM

Watch any one of David Mullen's films, he also rates 2/3 over.
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#6 Aaron Farrugia

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 06:20 AM

Yes this is what i'm talking about, do you have any examples of 2/3rds over - the final image? Simple I know

hey allyn long time no see!!
hows things?
you should get your hands on that book i told you about last year 'reflections'
VERY GOOD! got some examples in there all the way up to 3 stops over and printed back down and up to 3 stops under then printed back up
its great to get a visual reference of the effects of over and under exposure...
as john said in this post check out the technical curves for the stock was lookin at 500t curves and according to it u can get pretty close to 6 stops over

Edited by Aaron Farrugia, 31 July 2007 - 06:24 AM.

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#7 Robert Hughes

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 11:46 AM

Just because the negative can still get detail at x stops over doesn't mean you'll be able to make much use of it. In the darkroom they talk of the "blocking" of highlights, where the negative is so dense the only way to get print media to react properly is to dodge & burn by area. In previous years, one way to lessen the extremes of contrast was to make a contact-printed mask, to bipack with the original negative and effectively push the shadows closer to the highlights, but I don't know if anybody does that in MP film work anymore.

Any comments from the lab guys?
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