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Delicatessen


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#1 Matias Nicolas

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 01:03 PM

Hi !! I will be shooting a short film next month. an d I wolud like to achieve the same image as in this movie... most of it, the brown color... The thing is that we wil be using HD , not film... so I have to do this in the camera I suppose so... Can you give me any ideas? or do you know if he used a filter in camera? thanks !!
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 01:16 PM

Hi !! I will be shooting a short film next month. an d I wolud like to achieve the same image as in this movie... most of it, the brown color... The thing is that we wil be using HD , not film... so I have to do this in the camera I suppose so... Can you give me any ideas? or do you know if he used a filter in camera? thanks !!


It looks to me like there is an 85 filter (perhaps something weaker in the same series, but the color is pretty strong) on the lens all the time and then, additionally, some CTO on some lights some of the time.
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#3 Jason Debus

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 01:32 PM

The original Delicatessen thread has a lot of good info. Good luck trying to do it in HD!
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 04:21 PM

Actually it's pretty easy to crush the blacks and strip the color in HD. You just don't get quite the same "texture" from the silver particles in film.

If it's HD you can do a lot of it in post as well. But you'll have to test how far you can push the color correction with the codec you're using. You'll have to find a balance between what can be done well in camera, and what can be done better in post. If you crush the blacks too far in camera, you can't bring them back in post. But if you don't crush them enough, an increase in contrast can create visible "banding" in the gradients later. Same thing for color -- the more you do in camera (with lighting, filters, or the camera's color matrix), the cleaner the results. But then you don't leave yourself much room to bring it back toward "normal" in post.
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#5 Matias Nicolas

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 10:07 PM

I thought there was a tobacc filter in camera, not an 85 ...
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#6 Nathan Blair

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 10:40 PM

you'll have to test how far you can push the color correction with the codec you're using. You'll have to find a balance between what can be done well in camera


I agree. Do a few tests with your camera and with your post production to get the look you want. It's always better going in knowing what you're doing. Personally, I'd usually go with setting things up on camera, so that post production is much simpler, and if you've already tested it, you won't be sorry about it later.

And yes, I think that looks like a Tobacco filter.

Good luck,
Nate
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