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How To Open a Super 8 Cartridge?


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#1 Michael Waite

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 09:39 AM

A guy that I know decided to process a roll of Super 8 he'd shot. He said it was difficult to open the cartridge to get at the film. The only description I've read of someone else doing this they smashed it with a hammer. But he said even this didn't work well. I don't know all the details, this is via email.
Does anyone know the correct way to get the film out of a Super 8 cartridge? How does Dwayne's do it?
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#2 Giles Perkins

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 10:54 AM

There was a plan in Musitano's book which showed plans for a nifty little device to level the cart apart to remove the film. It was a piece of machined steel that you'd attach to your darkroom work surface. Very neat!
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#3 Terry Mester

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 04:37 PM

You can pry the back panel of the Cartridge open with a Flathead Screwdriver safely without damaging the Film. Since you're doing it in the dark, just be careful.
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#4 Rhonda L. McReynolds

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Posted 08 August 2007 - 01:02 PM

A guy that I know decided to process a roll of Super 8 he'd shot. He said it was difficult to open the cartridge to get at the film. The only description I've read of someone else doing this they smashed it with a hammer. But he said even this didn't work well. I don't know all the details, this is via email.
Does anyone know the correct way to get the film out of a Super 8 cartridge? How does Dwayne's do it?


There's a nifty little tool out there created just for that purpose. I've seen them on Super-8 enthusiasts' websites, but haven't been able to track one down myself. They were available in a kit for home processing.

Good luck!
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#5 Nick Mulder

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Posted 08 August 2007 - 07:05 PM

Maybe I'm doing something wrong, but why is this method hardly ever suggested:

Once its finished pull on the supply reel end of the film until the tape that is in there holding the film to the reel breaks then you can pull it out of the take-up side easily.

No need for any tools ... either that or simply cut the film and pull it out, but that requires scissors or some wasted/bent film from breaking it with yer jammy fingers

When pulling it out I try to keep the film on the same angle that it was on going in so as not to scratch it on anything. You can also develop the end of your film only keeping the rest in the cart, maybe put up some sort of exposure reference chart/whatever at the tail of your shoot so you can be sure of your developing time for the rest of the film.
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#6 Jim Carlile

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 02:47 AM

Maybe I'm doing something wrong, but why is this method hardly ever suggested:

Once its finished pull on the supply reel end of the film until the tape that is in there holding the film to the reel breaks then you can pull it out of the take-up side easily.


That's basically how labs do it. You can also twist back the take up reel until you hear it break loose, then pull out the film from the gateopening. No need to open the case. Just avoid scratching.

Kodak labs had extra-fancy machines that would do this automatically. The film was extracted from the gate opening.
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#7 Robert Hughes

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 09:33 AM

A couple weekends ago I opened up a Super8 cart with a bottle opener to one corner, just like cracking a beer.
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Willys Widgets

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks