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Orangewood sticks?


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#1 David Auner aac

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 11:49 AM

Hi folks,

I went to a couple of cosmetic stores today looking for orangewood sticks. The only sticks I found were rosewood. They look like larger toothpicks. Can I use these for cleaning the gate as well, or does orangewood have some special property that other kinds of wood lack?

Regards, Dave
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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 12:16 PM

I'm sure others will disagree as to their usefulness, but I had Orangewood sticks in my AC bag for five years, and never once used them.
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#3 John Sprung

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 12:53 PM

Hi folks,

I went to a couple of cosmetic stores today looking for orangewood sticks. The only sticks I found were rosewood. They look like larger toothpicks. Can I use these for cleaning the gate as well, or does orangewood have some special property that other kinds of wood lack?

Regards, Dave

I think the main issue is that you want a material that's hard enough to scrape emulsion deposits, but soft enough to pose absolutely no danger of damaging the surfaces. Orangewood is a little bit oily, which may be a slight advantage. Oranges were grown all over the LA area in the early 20th century, and most of the trees were taken out to make way for houses, so there would have been a massive supply of orangewood in the early days of Hollywood.

The last time I trimmed our orange tree, I saved a piece a couple feet long. I could send you some if you want.



-- J.S.
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#4 Ralph Keyser

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 06:22 PM

Can I use these for cleaning the gate as well, or does orangewood have some special property that other kinds of wood lack?


Orangewood is just a cheap, soft wood. Rosewood is a little harder (and I thought more expensive), but it isn't hard enough to damage the gate. You can even use the plastic sticks that you sometimes find as cuticle sticks. Really, just stay away from metal of any kind and you'll be fine.

BTW, this is one of those things that you'll seldom use on a well maintained camera package.
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#5 John Sprung

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 07:57 PM

BTW, this is one of those things that you'll seldom use on a well maintained camera package.

True, I think mainly because emulsions have been very much improved since the days when there were orange groves out here.



-- J.S.
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 11:00 PM

I've only had to use them a couple times. One was shooting in really hot, humid weather where the emulsion got sort of sticky. The other is threading an a-minima. My fingers are too big to do a lot of the job in there.
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#7 David Auner aac

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Posted 08 August 2007 - 01:22 AM

Thanks guys!

The last time I trimmed our orange tree, I saved a piece a couple feet long. I could send you some if you want.


That's nice for you to offer, but I guess shipping cost to Europe would be rather prohibitive. Thank you nevertheless.

Regards, Dave
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#8 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 08 August 2007 - 01:46 AM

I'm sure others will disagree as to their usefulness, but I had Orangewood sticks in my AC bag for five years, and never once used them.


Really? In 5 years you never got to clean and prep a gate? Even if I don't necessarily see any emulsion build up, I still run the stick around it just to be sure...and even then I still get some small amount of gunk on my orange stick.
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#9 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 23 August 2007 - 04:24 AM

by the way, I grew up on Orangewood Court...neat eh?
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#10 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 23 August 2007 - 05:22 AM

You may be looking in the wrong place. Orange sticks are used to push in cuticles, I found some at Walmart in the nail care section along with nail polish and emery boards, nail polish remover pads ect. I don't know if you have Walmarts, but I would imagine any large department store that has women's nail care supplies will carry them, even in Europe. B)
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#11 David Auner aac

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Posted 23 August 2007 - 05:37 AM

You may be looking in the wrong place. Orange sticks are used to push in cuticles, I found some at Walmart in the nail care section along with nail polish and emery boards, nail polish remover pads ect. I don't know if you have Walmarts, but I would imagine any large department store that has women's nail care supplies will carry them, even in Europe. B)


Yep, that's precisely the place I looked for them. They use rosewood sticks for that nowadays. I don't know why, I asked around and a number of people remember orange wood being sold a couple of years ago.

Cheers, Dave
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#12 Paul Bruening

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Posted 23 August 2007 - 09:50 AM

I know this is just a step off topic, but... My grandfather had an orange farm in Alta Dena well before it got totally developed with housing. Are any of you guys near Alta Dena?
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#13 Chris Keth

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Posted 23 August 2007 - 03:16 PM

Yep, that's precisely the place I looked for them. They use rosewood sticks for that nowadays. I don't know why, I asked around and a number of people remember orange wood being sold a couple of years ago.

Cheers, Dave


I got orange ones at wal-mart. I didn't seek orangewood out or anything, that's just what they had. They smell nice.

Anything hard enough to scrape emulsion off but soft enough to not mar the gate is fine.
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#14 Mitch Gross

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Posted 23 August 2007 - 09:04 PM

Anyone who has shot B&W stocks has felt the need for a good orangewood stick.
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#15 Adam Dautry

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 01:31 PM

stay away from orangewood pleaseeeee
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#16 Chris Keth

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 01:34 PM

stay away from orangewood pleaseeeee


Why? It's what camera assistants have used for the better part of a century. I see no reason to change because you whine about it.
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#17 Adam Thompson

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 09:50 PM

Hi folks,

I went to a couple of cosmetic stores today looking for orangewood sticks. The only sticks I found were rosewood. They look like larger toothpicks. Can I use these for cleaning the gate as well, or does orangewood have some special property that other kinds of wood lack?

Regards, Dave


Couple packs of these should last you forever. http://www.filmtools.com/wc-597-5.html
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#18 A. Whitehouse

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 10:45 PM

The other is threading an a-minima. My fingers are too big to do a lot of the job in there.


Isn't that a fiddly operation. I ended up doing it mostly with my pinky. After twelve loads I never quite got a hang of it. Quite a bit of trial and error, I might just try a stick next time.
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#19 Chris Keth

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 03:41 PM

Isn't that a fiddly operation. I ended up doing it mostly with my pinky. After twelve loads I never quite got a hang of it. Quite a bit of trial and error, I might just try a stick next time.


I have it down after a whole bunch of mags. Probably shot 50 or 60 through it by now. I do a lot of things with fingertips but sometimes I use the stick to gently pull the pulldown claw out so I can slip film under it.
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