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Transporting Chinese Lanterns


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#1 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 03:30 AM

Any tips on transporting these lanterns so they don't get damaged.
Don't worry I'm talking about when they are flat!
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#2 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 04:37 AM

2000' film cans do the trick for the smaller lanterns.
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#3 Barry Cheong

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 04:37 AM

I use re-inforced art portfolio's. They're strong and flat themselves.
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#4 Patrick Lavalley

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 08:53 AM

You could build a flat wooden box around 1-4 inches thick, depending on how many lanterns you want to carry.
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#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 11:14 AM

I just keep them in the box they came in, paperlanternstore.com ships them out in some good sized cardboard boxes.

And oooooo, I'm gonna try and get my hands on a couple of 2000' cans ;)
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#6 JD Hartman

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 01:13 PM

Coroplast, the corregated plastic sheet that is used to print disposable advertising and political signs. Easily cut with a utility knife, lantern is kept between two sheet, with a strip of gaff tape on each side. Can be purchased at a plastics supply. Or you can collect old signs and reduce visual pollution in the landscape.
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#7 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 03:19 PM

Does anyone know the size of those fibreboard cases with the straps that 35mm projection reels are shipped in?
I also thought that perhaps inexpensive rigid cymbal cases might do it as well.
I guess I am answering my own post.
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#8 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 06:17 PM

Perhaps a large photodisc pouch would work as well :)
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#9 Rob Featherstone

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 10:35 PM

I've been using an artists portfolio case I got at pearl paint. It works really well.

-Rob Featherstone
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#10 Bill Totolo

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 01:52 AM

How about a pizza box?
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#11 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 02:43 AM

A pizza box is a bit light weight (no pun intended) for transport in a vehicle loaded with equipment.
Photodisk pouches are not rigid enough and also difficult to buy without the Photodisk :-)
By artists portfolio you mean those things that are two pieces of heavy cardboard held together on 4 sides with cotton ribbons?
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#12 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 03:20 AM

I still stand by the film cans, they are free and super solid. They can hold most sizes but the largest. I have been doing it for years and years and have never had it fail me.
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#13 Daniel Christie

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 12:28 AM

Coroplast, the corregated plastic sheet that is used to print disposable advertising and political signs. Easily cut with a utility knife, lantern is kept between two sheet, with a strip of gaff tape on each side. Can be purchased at a plastics supply. Or you can collect old signs and reduce visual pollution in the landscape.


Incidentally, also the stuff Kino Flo fixtures are made of. Known as Coroflute in some parts (such as Australia) ;)
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