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Super 8 postage - heat question


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#1 Ralph Tabith

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 10:56 AM

Hi, I am in the Uk and have ordered some super 8 plus x from the US. Now its best to keep it cool/cold and it probably will be exposed to heat during postage. Now, how long does it take for film to be exposed to heat before it starts to deteriorate? Thanks!

Edited by Ralph Tabith, 10 August 2007 - 10:58 AM.

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#2 Jim Simon

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 03:52 PM

What makes you think adding postage will create heat?
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#3 e gustavo petersen

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 11:09 PM

What makes you think adding postage will create heat?


I believe we have a difference of terms with our cousin from across the lake. By "postage" I believe he means "mailing". Or maybe not.

To the question of "deteriorating" strictly speaking it's aways deteriorating. But the heat from its travel across the Atlantic would most likely do little to no damage to the film. Plus X is a slow, some might say middle speed film at 125. I think you'll be fine so long as you keep it in a cool place until you need it. Then, enjoy.
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#4 Ralph Tabith

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 02:43 AM

I believe we have a difference of terms with our cousin from across the lake. By "postage" I believe he means "mailing". Or maybe not.



Thanks for putting my mind at ease, oh yes and by postage I do mean mailing, you know in 400 years if the human race is still here I think American will be its own distinct language!
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#5 Jim Simon

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 01:06 PM

The question still applies. What makes you think being mailed will expose the package to heat?
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#6 e gustavo petersen

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 01:18 PM

The question still applies. What makes you think being mailed will expose the package to heat?


I'm not speaking for Ralph, but to answer your question, there can be several places where transporting the film (or any package for that matter) might be subjected to heat. The delivery truck from the vendor to the shipper's distribution center. The flight over seas will likely be temperature control but, depending on the shipper, the package could be subjected to sever cold. And then again heat could an issue from the distribution center in the UK to his home.

When shipping overseas, it's alway a good idea to make arrangements with the shipping carrier by informing them that film is being transported. Here again, my point still applies, the speed of his film isn't likely to experience any adverse affects from heat radiation. He's more likely to have problems from an X-ray machine but here again, I think that's unlikely.
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#7 Ralph Tabith

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 05:17 PM

The question still applies. What makes you think being mailed will expose the package to heat?


Hi, I could think of lots of instances where exposure to heat could happen - sitting in a car/van would surely be a warm/hot environment.
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#8 Jim Simon

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 10:50 PM

Sorry, but I just don't see that shipping would be hot enough to cause any damage to film. I can't believe a shipping company, at least not a reputable one like FedEx or UPS or DHL, would be so irresponsible as to leave packages in an excessively hot vehicle.

Personally, I think this is a non-issue.
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#9 Terry Mester

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 12:11 AM

I can't believe a shipping company, at least not a reputable one like FedEx or UPS or DHL, would be so irresponsible as to leave packages in an excessively hot vehicle.


I don't know about this DHL! Take a look at Sean McHenry's processed films mailed to him via DHL (it's on his "Pro8mm may have ruined my project" Thread). His films look like they were sitting in a hot mail truck for half a day. In Canada, I've never heard of DHL. I don't think they can be that big of an outfit if they don't even operate throughout Canada.

Ralph, if you've ordered these films from Kodak, why haven't they shipped them from their UK Offices? It doesn't make sense for them to ship from the US. From what I understand, Royal Mail delivers twice a day. You won't need to worry about it sitting in a hot truck in England.
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#10 Mark Dunn

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 09:58 AM

http://www.dhl.ca/ca/
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#11 Ralph Tabith

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 12:52 PM



Ralph, if you've ordered these films from Kodak, why haven't they shipped them from their UK Offices? .


I have bought them off of a chap on Ebay, he seems to be genuine but I am testing him out...
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#12 Jim Simon

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 06:22 PM

I don't know about this DHL! Take a look at Sean McHenry's processed films mailed to him via DHL (it's on his "Pro8mm may have ruined my project" Thread). His films look like they were sitting in a hot mail truck for half a day.


The claim is that the reels were improperly packed and crushed, not exposed to excessive heat. The driver would have roasted in heat enough to cause the damage his pictures show.

I still think this is a non-issue. Films have been getting shipped to theaters all over the world for many decades now.

Edited by Jim Simon, 13 August 2007 - 06:24 PM.

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#13 Mark Dunn

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 03:26 AM

>I still think this is a non-issue. Films have been getting shipped to theaters all over the world for many >decades now.


Not unexposed film. It's much more susceptible.
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#14 e gustavo petersen

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 03:39 AM

Not unexposed film. It's much more susceptible.


Exactly. Processed film can warp from excessive heat but the films going to theaters are well guarded against such mishaps - I hope. As for unexposed film, fogging from excessive heat can happen but sticking to the original posting, a film like Plus X with an ISO of 64T, 80D, it would take a very long exposure to high heat to damage it in a significant way. (By the way, I was mistaken in my previous post when I typed 125 - that's for the still film 125PX. Did no one catch that?)
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#15 Jim Simon

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 06:16 PM

Even unexposed film has been shipped to distributors worldwide for many decades now. Where do you think those rolls of 35mm on the shelves of Wal-Mart come from?

I still think this is a non-issue.
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