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Release print vs. IP


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#1 Paulo Ardolino

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 07:38 PM

Hello there,
I am currently finishing up the post process on my 35mm short. I am finishing on film and I am looking the best possible way to master my film for DVD/festival purposes. I originally wanted to telecine off the cut neg however I was told that is a near impossibility do to the fact that I would have jumps from the cuts. The next best alternative is the IP, but are the quality benefits enough to offset the costs (nearly 4 times the cost of a release print).

I'm looking to make no more than 3 release prints therefore an IP to IN to release is moot. However I don't want to telecine a release print of the look is going to be anything less than professional. I've been looking everywhere for some literature on the IP process, and have had little luck. If you have any references or advice I would greatly appreciate your response.

Best Wishes,

P.

Edited by Paulo Ardolino, 13 August 2007 - 07:39 PM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 07:44 PM

You can either telecine the cut negative, or a low-con "Teleprint" or an IP off of the negative. A low-con print is only a little better than using a projection-contrast print. IP is the best option since it also serves as a protection master. Is your negative A-B cut or single-strand?
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#3 Paulo Ardolino

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 10:29 PM

You can either telecine the cut negative, or a low-con "Teleprint" or an IP off of the negative. A low-con print is only a little better than using a projection-contrast print. IP is the best option since it also serves as a protection master. Is your negative A-B cut or single-strand?

Wow David Mullen! Northfork is one of the most beautiful, best shot movies ever in my opinion (as well as an inspiration for a section of this film)! Thank you for your response...

My negative is an A-B cut. I'm just curious as to why the IP is such higher quality than say a release print? Is it just that the stock is acetate and not SR? Or is it simply all in the contrast? Again any feedback is greatly appreciated!

Best wishes,

P.
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#4 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 12:59 AM

IP has a very low contrast and on a modern telecine will transfer much better than a print. Teleprint stock is better than a release print but little used these days.

If the customer opts for a digital grading session on our Baselight, then we prefer a transfer from the negative direct, even if it is AB rolls. In this case we transfer direct to our server as DPX 10bit log, and do the single roll assembly in Baselight during the grading.
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#5 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 08:14 AM

For budget reasons I once telecined a 35mm short with mostly night exteriors from a release print and it doesn't look good. The shadow detail really clogged up.
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#6 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 03:12 PM

IP has a very low contrast and on a modern telecine will transfer much better than a print. Teleprint stock is better than a release print but little used these days.

If the customer opts for a digital grading session on our Baselight, then we prefer a transfer from the negative direct, even if it is AB rolls. In this case we transfer direct to our server as DPX 10bit log, and do the single roll assembly in Baselight during the grading.

Don't forget also that an Interpos is a masked film so that it will give better colour reproduction than a print.
Brian
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 09:21 PM

Don't forget also that an Interpos is a masked film so that it will give better colour reproduction than a print.
Brian


The masking doesn't really help in a telecine; it's something that correct out actually, hence why the newer "scanner friendly" stocks tend to have a low-density color mask. Color masking is to improve color in the print made off of the negative or internegative.

Projection prints have a very high contrast so that blacks will look black when a projector light blasts through the print and shines the image onto a white surface. But that contrast makes them poor choices for telecine transfers. Also, prints are made on continuous contact printers, whereas an IP is made on a pin-registered step printer usually, so they can be sharper and steadier. But it's mainly the fact that the IP has nearly the same contrast as original negative that makes it so good for telecine transfer.

Also, if your negative is A-B cut, then you'd have to do a video assembly edit after the transfer, plus matching a cut that takes place between an A-roll and B-roll shot is harder to do. Plus you probably A-B cut your neg for fades and dissolves, which would also have to be recreated in a video online-type session after the transfer.
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