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need help : how to achieve a dream-like sequence


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#1 ahmad ikhwan

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 08:48 PM

hi.. i am a student filmmaker who is going to shoot my thesis project in another 2 weeks! I need a professional advice on how to light a dream-like sequence. the scene is about a boy dreaming of his late mommy and him playing together, its indoor, but there are windows in the shot and the scene is during daylight... so i want it to look bright, yellow-ish, overexposed kind of thing, but i want it to look memorable, sweet memories kinda look.. sephia kinda look, but not exactly sephia... i want it to look soft.. but at the same time bright
so.. how do i light this scene without making it look burned? please give me advice with what light should i use, gels... etc

and also, i need to shoot a scene, something like the scene in The Graduate, where Dustin Hoffman's character is chilling out at the pool, and his parents and his parents friends came to talk to him... I want that look of his parents and their friends, where u can't really see their faces.. u can only see their silhoutte.. I am going to shoot this scene outdoors, in the cemetery.. without electricity access..

please help. I'm sorry for my poor english.

Oh yes.. I am going to shoot this on Panasonic HVX200

Thank You. :rolleyes: :P
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#2 David Regan

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 10:43 PM

Your description of how you want the dream sequence to look, made me think immedietly of the flashback sequences in The Illusionist. I think I remember reading something in ASC magazine about how they achieved this sepia look but not actually being sepia. Perhaps try looking up some information on that film and you might get some ideas or a place to start from.
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#3 ahmad ikhwan

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 03:41 AM

Thanks! I haven't seen the film yet but I will check it out! ;)
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#4 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 03:48 AM

first: bright golden yellow back light, soft key, even fill, eye light, mist it and put a bit of Vaseline on the edges of clear lens filter.

second: strong back light, no key, dim fill. use reflectors, sun and/or mirror.

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 18 August 2007 - 03:49 AM.

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#5 ahmad ikhwan

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 05:12 AM

Thanks a lot James! That's very useful! Really appreciate it! I never used vaseline on lens filter before, that a really cool trick... but it wont damage the filter, will it?

God bless
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#6 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 06:47 AM

Shouldn't, it's an old Hollywood trick. Just clean it well when you done. If your worried, put the Vaseline on a pane of regular glass, set it up in front of the camera and shoot through that. B)
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#7 Paul Bruening

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 08:42 AM

Hey,

There's already a thread in here on this topic. Actually, any thing you can think of and can afford will stand for a dream sequence. It really doesn't have to require any particular effects. David Lynch did most of his with peculiar acting from his performers. That didn't cost a dime more beyond a regular shoot. If you can get your mits on a copy of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me you'll see just how dreamy and creepy a simple approach can be. "With this riiiiing, I the Wehhhhhhhhhhhd."
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#8 Adamo P Cultraro

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 11:59 PM

Why not jus do this in post? Most NLEs have this capability. In Sony Vegas for example, use a glow and then tint the glow to the color you want. Apply a 25% B&W effect and voila....dream sequence. Most of the Illusionist was simply post work anyways.
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Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

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Visual Products

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rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Technodolly

Wooden Camera