Jump to content


Photo

New transfer of "Days of Heaven" from Criterion


  • Please log in to reply
34 replies to this topic

#1 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 18 August 2007 - 02:39 AM

http://www.criterion.com/blog/

It's hard to imagine it with less gold or warm tones...but I guess we'll see.
  • 0

#2 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 August 2007 - 03:05 AM

I'm very happy that Criterion is releasing this film, they are simply the best company. Their dvds are always top notch quality, especially image and sound wise.

Thanks for the above blog by the way, I added it to my favourties already!
  • 0

#3 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 18 August 2007 - 07:45 AM

I always thought that the existing home video versions were rather golden compared to the release prints from Metrocolor originally.
  • 0

#4 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 August 2007 - 11:43 AM

I'm not sure if I've ever seen 'Days of Heaven' on the big screen. Must keep an eye out if it ever gets screened anywhere.
  • 0

#5 Ignacio Aguilar

Ignacio Aguilar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Madrid, Spain

Posted 18 August 2007 - 01:06 PM

I hope they'll release it on HD-DVD or Blu-Ray as well.
  • 0

#6 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 August 2007 - 02:04 PM

Criterion apparently wants to wait until the Blue Ray vs HD-DVD issue has been settled, they don't want to bet on the wrong horse. I hope their contracts with the various distributors include a HD release as well.
  • 0

#7 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 18 August 2007 - 05:35 PM

I'm not sure if I've ever seen 'Days of Heaven' on the big screen. Must keep an eye out if it ever gets screened anywhere.


It played recently at the Castro here in SF one night...I didn't know about it until the day after, d'oh!
  • 0

#8 Wendell_Greene

Wendell_Greene
  • Sustaining Members
  • 545 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 August 2007 - 10:57 PM

"Days of Heaven" -Ready for Radical Departure on DVD

Hollywood Elsewhere article
  • 0

#9 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 19 August 2007 - 12:56 AM

Does anyone know how the original timing was handled? Personnel wise I mean. Did Almendros or Wexler sit in on the sessions or was it something Malick oversaw without DP input?

Curious
  • 0

#10 Mariano Nante

Mariano Nante
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 109 posts
  • Other

Posted 19 August 2007 - 09:20 PM

Does anyone know how the original timing was handled? Personnel wise I mean. Did Almendros or Wexler sit in on the sessions or was it something Malick oversaw without DP input?

Curious


Well, for what I have read, Almendros was almost blind in the end of the shoot. That's why Wexler had to step in... And the funny thing is that Wexler is color blind! :blink:
But together they made a masterpiece of cinematography...
  • 0

#11 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 19 August 2007 - 09:33 PM

Nestor Almendros had to leave the production because it went so long that it conflicted with a Truffaut (I believe) feature that he already promised to shoot, so Wexler came in to shoot the last few weeks.
  • 0

#12 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 20 August 2007 - 12:29 AM

I love that part about Wexler watching the film with a stopwatch in hand to keep track of what percentage of the film he had actually shot...which by his calculations turned out to be more than half.

It's understandable that he'd want that credit for Days of Heaven ;)
  • 0

#13 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 20 August 2007 - 03:46 AM

Well, for what I have read, Almendros was almost blind in the end of the shoot. That's why Wexler had to step in...

This is taken from the article Wendell linked earlier:

"Of course, Biskind also claims that director of photography Nester Almendros was "slowly going blind" and would have "one of his assistants take Polaroids of the scene, then examined them through very strong glasses and made his adjustments." It must have been taken Almendros a very long time to go blind, since he continued working as a cinematographer (Kramer vs. Kramer, Sophie's Choice, Places in the Heart) until 1991. "

Cinematical article
  • 0

#14 Ignacio Aguilar

Ignacio Aguilar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Madrid, Spain

Posted 20 August 2007 - 10:24 AM

Almendros' blindness is a myth. He worked as a DP until his death in 1991 and managed to get some Academy Award nominations since he did "Days of Heaven" in 1976. That rumor probably started because another famous Spanish DP, Luis Cuadrado, was losing his eyesight while shooting the award winning & gorgeous looking "El Espiritu de la Colmena" (VĂ­ctor Erice, 1973). The cinematography is not too different from the French New Wave of the 60's and the big DPs from the UK in the early 70's, like John Alcott and David Watkin. Cuadrado had to quit shooting two years later, when he was 42 years old, and commit suicide when he was completely blind, at 46. He's still considered Spain's greatest cinematographer ever and "El Espiritu de la Colmena" has been chosen a few times as the best photographed Spanish film of all time. Everyone with an interest in film & cinematography should take it a look IMHO.
  • 0

#15 Mitch Gross

Mitch Gross
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 20 August 2007 - 01:16 PM

I know a number of people who worked with Alemendros on his final film, Billy Bathgate, and the stories of his poor vision while exaggerated were true. And yet the film looked great and looked like one of his films.

...and in New York we still refer to foamcore lightboxes as Nestors.
  • 0

#16 Ignacio Aguilar

Ignacio Aguilar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Madrid, Spain

Posted 20 August 2007 - 01:44 PM

Don't forget he died right after that film from AIDS. It may have affected his vision as well.
  • 0

#17 Mitch Gross

Mitch Gross
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 20 August 2007 - 03:22 PM

Don't forget he died right after that film from AIDS. It may have affected his vision as well.

I believe it was a bout of pneumonia that took him in the end. His immune system was weakened by his condition, but I don't know if it had anything to do with his vision.
  • 0

#18 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 22 August 2007 - 02:30 AM

..."El Espiritu de la Colmena" has been chosen a few times as the best photographed Spanish film of all time. Everyone with an interest in film & cinematography should take it a look IMHO.


Gahhhh, such a gorgeous film.
  • 0

#19 Michel Hafner

Michel Hafner
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 300 posts
  • Other

Posted 29 August 2007 - 12:28 PM

I'm very happy that Criterion is releasing this film, they are simply the best company. Their dvds are always top notch quality, especially image and sound wise.

Not always. Like any other company they have issues with some of their titles.
  • 0

#20 Michel Hafner

Michel Hafner
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 300 posts
  • Other

Posted 29 August 2007 - 12:36 PM

http://www.criterion.com/blog/
It's hard to imagine it with less gold or warm tones...but I guess we'll see.

I deplore that they are not using the camera negative itself if they are talking definitve transfer and restoration. The IP already loses some detail. Since it's a 1978 negative on today's IP stock it's probably minimal, though.
  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

The Slider

CineLab

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Opal

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Tai Audio

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal