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plz teach me.


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#1 vikram singh mehra

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 07:19 AM

hello
dont angry evryone i m new in this field but i m crazy about this field i wn to know about.. colour temprature ,,, camera angles,,,n depth of field //// about RBG...n also what are the main colours create a good n better reality on screen ,,... i m story writer .. plz reply
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#2 Jacob Moeller

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 07:43 AM

Heya! I am by far not the most competent person to answer this but....

Like yourself (i expect) i havn't attented any kind of film school or nothing (i might later though, i am still quite young), but what i did when i some years ago got really into making movies i went to my local library and borrowed all the books on the subject that they would let me borrow and i read them :D I also got my hands on a cheap DV camera and started filming like crazy! As a result i know quite a bit today about what makes a good picture, color, what works and what doesn't and all that sorta stuff.

So i think that doing a bit of studying on your own is the best way of learning, if ofcourse... you don't go to filmschool or something.

Pretty standard responds is guess, hope it helps though :D
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 09:39 AM

I'm also going to chime in here and suggest picking up a kinda cheap film SLR, such as the Nikon FM10 (i've owned 3 of these cameras in my time.) Go out buy some film; color neg, color slide, b/w, in different ASAs (ISOs) and go out and shoot! Not only can you begin to learn composition but you'll see how color temperature effects a negative, how much information a negative can hold etc and you'll get a good idea how different film stocks differ. It's not going to be a direct approximation to cinematography, but it's a good sound building block, IMHO, and allows you to make mistakes without spending too much money (figure $10 for a roll of film and another $10 for processing; just shoot a roll a week!).
Over time you can even start buying new lenses (I'm a sucker for the Nikon E Series F1.8 50MM), used from places like BH and learn how the focal lengths effect such things as DoF, etc. (Also a lot of people are using prime adapters on DV/HD prosumer cameras now, generally in a Nikon or a Cannon mount, so you'll also be amassing a set of lenses you can take with you on such shoots!)
Just my 2 cents.
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