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gaffing, under water and flash light questions


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#1 Daniel Ainsworth

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 12:39 AM

Hello,
I will be gaffing a short film in the upcoming months and I had a few questions. There will be an underwater scene. A young girl swims to a treasure chest. Any suggestions about how to light a scene underwater, (murky water in order to see light beams). We won't have underwater lights. Besides that our package is pretty extensive.

Another shot requires a dying flashlight on a table. We wanted the flashlight to be facing open toward camera, so we can see the source flickering and dying, I have been trying to look, but do they create bulbs that flicker in such a way. Any ideas?

Thank you.

-Daniel
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 01:15 AM

If Kinoflo's are in your kit, you can put those underwater, just make sure the ballast isn't near it...that would be bad.

I'm curious to hear other people's methods of creating smoke-effect like murk underwater :)
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#3 Nick Mulder

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 01:26 AM

Another shot requires a dying flashlight on a table. We wanted the flashlight to be facing open toward camera, so we can see the source flickering and dying, I have been trying to look, but do they create bulbs that flicker in such a way. Any ideas?

Yip,

the type of bulb is called a 'flashlight bulb' - its the voltage that causes the flicker
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#4 Daniel Ainsworth

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 11:33 AM

Yip,

the type of bulb is called a 'flashlight bulb' - its the voltage that causes the flicker


der, forgot about that, thanks.

Kinos are included thank you as well. I didn't realize they were designed to be placed underwater? From experience if light needs to travel from above to say a 4ft shallow end of a pool, at night, would 2ks be enough, or should I be using much more. I am just unsure about how much the water will cause the light to dissipate.

I know when you shock a swimming pool with chlorine that would cause a murky look for a little bit.

Edited by Daniel Ainsworth, 20 August 2007 - 11:37 AM.

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#5 Xavier Plaza

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 12:22 PM

If Kinoflo's are in your kit, you can put those underwater, just make sure the ballast isn't near it...that would be bad.

I'm curious to hear other people's methods of creating smoke-effect like murk underwater :)



Hi Jonathan, did you say Kino's work well under water?, I didn't know that :blink: , what is the deepest depth they support...?

Thanks for the info



Xavier Plaza
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