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Emulating fast 360 dolly


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#1 herminio cordido

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Posted 24 August 2007 - 02:00 PM

Check this out:
Orbit Cam
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#2 Jason Debus

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Posted 24 August 2007 - 02:39 PM

Now anyone can be Michael Bay!!

That was a pretty funny video, especially when they finally showed the rig. Looks like that thing could be dangerous for the actors though.
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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 24 August 2007 - 02:52 PM

Yeah. Think, for a moment, exactly where it's going to return to in the end, once it runs out of puff.

You could put rockets on the back!

Phil
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#4 Chris Keth

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Posted 24 August 2007 - 04:38 PM

Not bad footage for such a stupid-looking rig. There are far better ways to do that, even on a budget. I wouldn't trust a camera on the thing.
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#5 Hal Smith

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Posted 24 August 2007 - 09:06 PM

I gotta admit it's got me thinking - I'd want a more positive method of determining the direction the camera's pointed. The use of a trailer hitch tongue and ball for counter weight is worthy of a "Golden Todo Juntos" award.
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#6 herminio cordido

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 12:33 AM

Not bad footage for such a stupid-looking rig. There are far better ways to do that, even on a budget. I wouldn't trust a camera on the thing.



yeah?
tell me one way of doing a 360 stable orbit without budget.
I'll be waiting...
H
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#7 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:15 PM

I'd hate to have to pay the insurance premiums on THAT set. That mess hit's an actor of even worse an actress, it's gonna REALLY hurt 'em, but it does create some cool footage. I just don't know how you could make it safe. :blink: Why would the guy use sharp, pointed tail fins when he could have easily rounded them and a receiver hitch at the front wit absolutely NO padding on it what so ever?

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 25 August 2007 - 11:19 PM.

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#8 robert duke

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 12:23 AM

herminio-It is not that it doesnt produce results. It is more that no only is it dangerous to the performers, but also to the equipment. It is also unpredictable and uncontrollable. Its sort of like strapping yourself to the hood of a car. It produces results but are the results worth the risk of injury and/or damaged equipment.

A turntable, circular dolly track, a steadicam, a glidecam, dancefloor are alternatives to your rig. Even a Wheelchair are alternatives that are not dangerous. these alternatives are probably the same cost ( rental) as building and rigging this rig. Risk is a factor of cost. how much would it cost to send the lead actor to a hospital and to lose your camera in the same moment? how much would it cost to lose a lead actor b/c they refused to perform inside the area the camera circles? how much does it cost to rent a steadicam for a day? how much does it cost to rent circular track for a day? how much would it cost to rent any alternative?

I think your rig could work it just needs a lot of improvement. Mostly controlability, less dangerous, repeatability. fix these problems and you are on to something. Also the rig wouldnt work outdoors, short ceilings, small rooms, etc. things to think about.

Herminio think about your risks and their costs.
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#9 herminio cordido

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 01:09 AM

hi guys
This rig is for NO budget productions, i mean, i spend 28$ on getting a steady orbit shot.
I am not planning to use it in the future, because i am moving on to bigger productions, but i think this concept would be usefull for upcoming filmakers.
The thing is, the tail had beautiful results with 28$ investment... That is why i post it in here.
H
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#10 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 02:40 AM

This rig is for NO budget productions, i mean, i spend 28$ on getting a steady orbit shot.


That budget's gonna skyrocket once the injuries and lawsuits arise. ;)

I really enjoyed that trailer hitch though...awesome
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#11 Bob Hayes

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 12:08 PM

Absolutely hilarious. This behind the scenes footage is some of the best I?ve seen. It sure looks dangerous to cast and equipment but it seems to work.
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#12 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 12:43 PM

It certainly does work, that much is unarguable.

Phil
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#13 jan von krogh

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 05:38 PM

cool, cheap, creative, chaotic.

i like it.

however adding some foam/airbags around it would be -highly- recommended.

anyhow, dangerous isnĀ“t a privilege of cheap tricks, i saw a motion control pull a fully equipped nle (with monitors) once.
the nle was tethered... and these bnc cables for sure were robust.
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#14 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 07:42 PM

I'd like to see it mounted on a motorised, rotating head at the top - a beefed-up version of what you'd use to hang a disco ball. That way, it would quickly settle down into a repeatable, reliable circular motion, which would be easier to block to, and probably safer for its predictability.

Phil

Edit: Actually, I wonder if it -would- be repeatable, but for shutter phase?
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#15 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 27 August 2007 - 04:54 AM

You know what would work and could be made to work relatively safely that would basically do the same this thing does is a counter balanced rig hung at a single pivot point like Rick Moranis' rig when he's searching for the kids in the backyard from Honey, I Shrunk the Kids. The counter weight would have to sit on top of the support beam to be out of frame and the camera would have to sit in a framework that hung down and would allow the camera angles to be adjusted, but basically you would have a lot more control over the camera's circular path and you could change the arch by moving the pivot point. It would be relatively cheap to build and if you used a crash cam or a light-weight cam like and Eyemo or a Konvas with a 200ft load, you wouldn't need too heavy a counter balance, especially if you off set the pivot point towards the camera a bit. It would certainly be cheaper than a curved track dolly rig and with a little practice, you could probably learn how to control it pretty well, plus if it looks like an actor is about to step into it's path, you have a much better chance of grabbing it and stopping it from braining 'em! :D

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 27 August 2007 - 04:57 AM.

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