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range of correction?


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#1 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 03:36 AM

hi
i'll soon have to time photochemicaly a short i filmed in 35mm .
i was wondering what is the range of corrections : points? how many ?over, under? and in what direction : primary colors? darker? clearer? what else?

thank you to enlight my candel on this point so i don't feel dumb at the lab.

it will be done at Dejong colors in brussels, that i know to be a lab of good reputation.
also dirk dejong is posting in this forum

thanks all
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#2 e gustavo petersen

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 04:33 AM

thank you to enlight my candel on this point so i don't feel dumb at the lab.


Oddly enough, you're probably best served by visiting the lab before you shoot your project. They can tell you, and best of all, show you exactly what you can expect from a photochemical finish and how much leeway you'll have. Also, you can develop a relationship with the lab technicians and when you have specific questions concerning your project, you'll have someone there to talk to that can answer your questions.

As to the rest of your question, much of it will be determined by the stock you're using, how you plan on exposing that stock and how you plan on developing your film. Here again, the lab can walk you through many of those questions and help you plan your photography accordingly.
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#3 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 04:37 AM

thanks for your response
but the film is shot for e year know and i know the look i want to acheive.
what i don't know is how to formulate it in the timer language : points, % or whatever i need to know the scales, the ranges
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#4 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 09:47 AM

thanks for your response
but the film is shot for e year know and i know the look i want to acheive.
what i don't know is how to formulate it in the timer language : points, % or whatever i need to know the scales, the ranges

The usual method of grading is the Model C method. This uses RED, GREEN and BLUE light. You can have a maximum of 50 lights for each colour giving you 125,000 combinations. From 1 to 50 where 1 is the lowest light and 50 is the highest light. Each light has a value of 0.025Log E, 12 lights is the equivalent of doubling/halving the light or 1 camera stop. 1 printer point change in any colour is just visible to the trained graders eye. There are some diagrams and pictures on my website of the Model C lamp house

http://www.brianprit...com/Model C.htm

and there is also a diagram illustrating in which direction you have to change the lights to change the colour on the page about grading.

http://www.brianprit...com/GRADING.htm

When you are grading Colour Neg to Colour print you have to decrease the lights of the colour you want to increase. So if you want to make your print redder then you decrease the Red light value.

I could email you some pictures showing the effect of 4 point printer changes if you are interested.


Brian
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#5 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:13 AM

well thanks
yes i'm verry interested.
as long as i don't have my printing lights, copie zero i can't ask anything correct?
will the color timer be able to make the first print from what he see on the neg or from the tc or will he do a one light best light print?
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#6 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:16 AM

your links replyed already thanks
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:16 AM

The usual method of grading is the Model C method. This uses RED, GREEN and BLUE light. You can have a maximum of 50 lights for each colour giving you 125,000 combinations. From 1 to 50 where 1 is the lowest light and 50 is the highest light. Each light has a value of 0.025Log E, 12 lights is the equivalent of doubling/halving the light or 1 camera stop.


I think a stop is more like 6 to 8 printer light points, not 12.
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#8 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:25 AM

I think a stop is more like 6 to 8 printer light points, not 12.

1 printer point is 0.025 LogE - 12 printer points is 0.3 LogE (0.25 X 12 = 0.3) a change of 0.3 log E is a doubling or halving the amount of light which is 1 stop. The amount of density change will depend on the gamma of the stock being printed. 1 printer point changes an Eastman Colour print by a density of 0.7.


Brian
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#9 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:42 AM

Jean-Marie,

Don't worry, we have a very experienced film grader and he will help you to get the look you want even if you don't talk 'printer points'

You can sit in on the film analyser session and you will see a simultated film print on the monitor. If you explain to the grader what you want he will work with you to get it close on the first trial print and then screen it with you and fine tune it.

Looking forward to meeting you
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#10 Max Jacoby

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:55 AM

I think a stop is more like 6 to 8 printer light points, not 12.

I was also under the impression that it was 8.
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#11 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 01:16 PM

I believe we are talking about different things here. If you increase printer exposure by 12 points as I have shown this doubles the amount of light which is the equivalent of one stop.

If you are talking about increasing exposure on a colour neg by 1 stop you will increase the density of a point on the straight line portion of the curve by 0.6 X 0.3 = 1.8 which equals 7 printer points on the Model C scale (1.8/.025) so you would have to reduce the exposure on the printer by about 7 points to get the same density.

Brian
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