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How was this shot composed


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#1 Sean Curt

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 08:49 AM

In this shot http://seancurt.goog...dmx-picture.jpg
How was this stark feel created. I just bought a crimson background and when I saw this photo I wanted to create somthing like it. But didnt know what was done on set, then what is done in photoshop?

Anyone with any ideas?
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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 09:40 AM

He's lit with a ringlight - you can see it reflected in his eyes. That's about it, as far as I can see. Nothing that screams photoshop.
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 02:47 PM

Wow! I would never have recognised that. I now know what purpose the ringlights have. :)

Ta muchly Stuart. ;)
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 09:23 PM

Wow! I would never have recognised that. I now know what purpose the ringlights have. :)


They're pretty much only good for rap videos & fashion shoots. Not for practical natural usage.
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 10:24 PM

Well, they were used in Alien Resurrection

Although I'm sure there's more to the apparently eternal youth of Winona Ryder than that.

Phil
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 10:42 PM

It's a little more than just a ring light, although it's the same principle. It looks like foamcore bounce around all four sides of the lens, giving a softer front-light than a ringlight would. That's why there's that broad, flat reflection on his forehead and the reflection in the eyes is so large. Same principle, just larger and softer.

You can use this type of lighting as frontal fill, like to smooth out the wrinkles on an aging actress. Nothing says it has to be your key light, or at key level. When it's used as subtle fill it's essentially "invisible," since there are no shadows.
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#7 Chayse Irvin

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:16 PM

They're pretty much only good for rap videos & fashion shoots. Not for practical natural usage.


I disagree. I used one not to long ago on a car interior scene for a little frontal fill. It worked great.


It's a little more than just a ring light, although it's the same principle. It looks like foamcore bounce around all four sides of the lens, giving a softer front-light than a ringlight would. That's why there's that broad, flat reflection on his forehead and the reflection in the eyes is so large. Same principle, just larger and softer.


I agree, the highlight blooming effect on his skin comes from a much softer quality of light then just a ring light. I think it is as you say, soft sources from 4 sides or at least one from above and below the lens.

Edited by Chayse Irvin, 25 August 2007 - 11:18 PM.

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#8 David Auner aac

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 05:53 AM

I agree, the highlight blooming effect on his skin comes from a much softer quality of light then just a ring light. I think it is as you say, soft sources from 4 sides or at least one from above and below the lens.


My guess is multiple frames filled with 216 or the like to the left & right of and above the camera.

Cheers, Dave
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#9 Sean Curt

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 07:10 AM

It's a little more than just a ring light, although it's the same principle. It looks like foamcore bounce around all four sides of the lens, giving a softer front-light than a ringlight would. That's why there's that broad, flat reflection on his forehead and the reflection in the eyes is so large. Same principle, just larger and softer.

You can use this type of lighting as frontal fill, like to smooth out the wrinkles on an aging actress. Nothing says it has to be your key light, or at key level. When it's used as subtle fill it's essentially "invisible," since there are no shadows.



thanks M Nash and David. You're one of few insightful comments

Edited by Sean Curt, 26 August 2007 - 07:11 AM.

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#10 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 09:30 AM

I'm going to stick with the ringlight, albeit a large one. The reflection in his eyes is definitely circular, and it's large enough to suggest a ringlight at least 3 feet in diameter.

Whether it was a ringlight or trace frames or foamcore really doesn't matter though, as Michael says, it's all the same principle.
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