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Fuji F-400 / Fuji F-500


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#1 Tebbe Schoeningh

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 04:39 PM

Hi!

In about two months I´m going to shoot a 10 min shortfilm on 16mm.
There will be mainly two looks/light-situations.

The first one is night-interior, low-light and high contrast with deep green tones dominating and I want to "justify" the light by only one visible source (im going to attach a picture of the desk lamp, it´s the typical "old-fashioned" library-lamp).
To reach a high-contrast looks with the colors "popping-out", I plan to underexpose and push-process the negative by one stop. Anyway, I´d like the image to be as clean as posible and avoid to have a grainy look...

The second one is day-interior (actually it´s the same apartment but it´s day...) and I want the light to "invade" the room coming in through the half-closed curtains (maybe I´ll use some ambient smoke). The look should be less contrasty and kind of cold so I thought of overexpose and pull process at least one stop. We also want some grain in this scene.

The projects budget is quiet low (we´re all students...hehe) and we don´t have a lot of light available so I´m considering to use fast emulsions like Kodak Vision2 500T 7218 or Fuji F-400 8682 (for the day-interior) and Fuji F-500 8672 (for the night-scenes).

Fuji´s student-politics is quiet fair here in Argentina, they offered single-perforated F-400 and F-500 at 60 Dollars which is about 40 Dollars less than Kodak, so I think we go for it. But my problem is, that I don´t know much about the look of Fuji-Emulsions and how it reacts on under- and overexposure. In fact all the tests at film-school we´re doing on Kodak Vision (1) or Kodak Vision2 and almost everything I know about shooting on film is pure theory because this is going to be my first project on film as DP. I feel quiet unsure about what we´re going to do and how to expose (yeah, in fact i´m afraid of messing it up...hehe) that´s why I´d like to hear somebody´s opinion about this who actually has got experience with shooting on F-400 and F-500 in situations which are comparable to the ones I described before...

Thank you very much for your answers!

Tebbe
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 27 August 2007 - 01:22 PM

To reach a high-contrast looks with the colors "popping-out", I plan to underexpose and push-process the negative by one stop. Anyway, I´d like the image to be as clean as posible and avoid to have a grainy look...

...I thought of overexpose and pull process at least one stop. We also want some grain in this scene.



If you're going for a high contrast look with poppy colors, underexposing won't be the direction you'll want to go. If you underexpose, the negative won't have as much information to pick up more color from when you go to print. Your results will be seemingly pastel-like colors with milky blacks and more grain...the opposite of what you're going for. By overexposing and printing down (not pull processing), you'll get deeper blacks and stronger colors.

Shooting 400 or 500 speed film, you'll get a healthy amount of grain regardless. I would just generally overexpose everything by 2/3 a stop, process normal and print down. Make sure to shoot your grey card the same way you'll be shooting everything else, so your colorist knows what you're going for.
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#3 Tebbe Schoeningh

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Posted 27 August 2007 - 04:22 PM

First: thank you, Jonathan.

I did´nt understand what you mean with "printing down". Do you refer to the final print to positive for the 35mm copy?
If you mean that, I´ll have to find a different way because we don´t have the budget for a blow up. By now the finish will be in DVD and 16mm positive...
What would you suggest?

Thanks!

Tebbe
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 27 August 2007 - 05:09 PM

I did´nt understand what you mean with "printing down". Do you refer to the final print to positive for the 35mm copy?
If you mean that, I´ll have to find a different way because we don´t have the budget for a blow up. By now the finish will be in DVD and 16mm positive...
What would you suggest?


It has nothing to do with a blowup to 35mm.

"Printing down" is simply done during the timing stage when you go to telecine or print. If you overexpose your negative and process normal, you're given a denser negative to work with. So in the color timing stage, your colorist will adjust your timing lights to achieve the image you're going for. Going from an overexposed negative to a properly timed positive/telecine is "printing down".
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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 27 August 2007 - 06:22 PM

I have a bit of experience with Fuji stocks so I thought I would chime in. If available, and it really should be by now, use the Eterna line of emulsions. Both the Eterna 400 and 500 will be finer grained than the F series stocks. For the daylight interior, may I suggest using the 250D stock. It is lower in contrast and color saturation and again finer grained than the 400 speed. It may be easier all around if you use one stock, being the Eterna 500T, it will give you both the looks you are looking for and ample speed given your limited lighting budget. All Fuji stock benefit greatly from overexposure. When under exposed, they tend to get grainy quite fast. You may . I know when I was a student, the Fuji rep was so nice, they threw in many 100 foot test rolls of many stocks so I could see for myself what they would look like. If you can afford it or it is free, test all the stocks. I have attached a still from a film I made on the 250T, it may give you an idea of what to expect.
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#6 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 27 August 2007 - 08:38 PM

Eterna 250T is a gorgeous stock by the way, as you can see in that photo. I've shot quite a bit with it and have always been happy with the results :)
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#7 Tebbe Schoeningh

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Posted 27 August 2007 - 11:00 PM

Thank you very much, both of you!

I´d love to do some tests, but I don´t know if well be able to. First problem is the equipment, I dont know if it will be available for some tests, second problem is the budget. I dont know if Fuji will give us some emulsions to test, and buying it will be almost impossible.

I like the pic you attached, especially the skin tones look beautiful!

Greetings

Tebbe

PS: I´m thinking of renting some lenses, because the Schneider Kreuznach Zoom which is coming with the Arriflex 16 BL we´re going to use has seen sharper days. Which lenses would you recommend?
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#8 Chris Burke

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 06:23 AM

I dont know if Fuji will give us some emulsions to test, and buying it will be almost impossible.

Highly unlikely. Unless Fuji's policies in Argentina are different than in the US, once you commit to buying stock from them, them will give you some test rolls. Also, whick lab are you using? Fuji has network of lab world wide, that they deal with. The lab should give you some stock for testing purposes. Especially when they will be doing your processing and perhaps printing. If you don't have a lab yet and can deal with the delays in shipping, may I suggest www.cinelab.com, they have extememly affordable student rates for Fuji. Contact them and ask for Rob, tell him I sent you.

In terms of lens choices, a set of Zeiss Super Speeds is always a first choice for me. If you have to get a zoom, the Canon 8-64 is fantastic as well. Good luck.


chris
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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

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Technodolly

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Opal

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine