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Eyes Wide Shut and push processing


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#1 Kevin Curtin

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 08:22 PM

Hey guys, I had a quick question for all you. I was recently reading up on Eyes Wide Shut after watching the film again for some inspiration (I'm shooting a film coming up and I wanted to watch the scene when they go to Sydney Pollack's party) about how to use practicals to light a 'party' scene. Anyways, I read that Kubrick and his DP (blanking on the name) pushed the film in order to make the lighting look more natural. I know pushing it makes it more grainy and contrasty, but does that in turn make it more natural? Is that simply all it means?
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 08:58 PM

Hey guys, I had a quick question for all you. I was recently reading up on Eyes Wide Shut after watching the film again for some inspiration (I'm shooting a film coming up and I wanted to watch the scene when they go to Sydney Pollack's party) about how to use practicals to light a 'party' scene. Anyways, I read that Kubrick and his DP (blanking on the name) pushed the film in order to make the lighting look more natural. I know pushing it makes it more grainy and contrasty, but does that in turn make it more natural? Is that simply all it means?


Here is my guess, only a guess as to why they might do it.

Perhaps the push was done for the contrast more than anything else. There were a LOT of practicals and long takes requiring 360-degree views. If left alone, the film might have been on the flat side. A push would give them a bit more contrast to make the scene look a bit richer with more fall-off to the light.
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#3 Xavier Plaza

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 11:14 PM

Anyways, I read that Kubrick and his DP (blanking on the name) pushed the film in order to make the lighting look more natural.


The Dp was Larry Smith and perhaps this help

http://www.theasc.co...sword/index.htm

Xavier Plaza
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#4 Kevin Curtin

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 11:38 PM

The Dp was Larry Smith and perhaps this help

http://www.theasc.co...sword/index.htm

Xavier Plaza



That's a great read, thank you very much. Answers a couple of other questions I had as well.
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#5 Simon Miya

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Posted 30 August 2007 - 10:40 PM

The push processing was used to make it possible to shoot with less light. That is what made it more natural.
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#6 Kevin Curtin

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 02:10 AM

The push processing was used to make it possible to shoot with less light. That is what made it more natural.



This was my original thought since it is the most logic answer, but thought I'd try and look a little more. Thanks.
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