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4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days


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#1 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 01:39 AM

hi
i'v just seen the movie released this wek in France.
after a few second i heard a little voice telling me :"wait a second it's scope!"


this movie is mostly handheld, it's a cold winter in roumania under the caucescu regime, tow girls are in deep poop, everything is sadness, intimistic.


what does justify cinemascope to you, for this kind of story?

i don't say i didn't like it, i juster wonder why this choice of scope.
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#2 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 02:50 AM

I'm getting ready to do a exploitation horror movie is scope. The material doesn't really matter, it's the artistic judgment of the director and cinematographer. I personally feel a film that say has the main characters feeling trapped and beset on all sides would be a bad choice for scope but that's exactly what my film is about. The difference is they're in the middle of the desert and their prison is the vast wasteland. The use of negative space will help me to convey the fact that they are utterly on their own. It will help convey the overwhelming power of the land around them and how small they are in it. See, it's how you use the scope images not necessarily the story it's self.
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#3 Max Jacoby

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 04:32 AM

hi
i'v just seen the movie released this wek in France.
after a few second i heard a little voice telling me :"wait a second it's scope!"
this movie is mostly handheld, it's a cold winter in roumania under the caucescu regime, tow girls are in deep poop, everything is sadness, intimistic.
what does justify cinemascope to you, for this kind of story?

i don't say i didn't like it, i juster wonder why this choice of scope.

I looked up imdb, it's shot in Super35, not anamorphic. From what I heard about the film, I did not expect them to do 10 minute handheld takes with an anamorphic lens on...

I haven't seen the film yet, so I can't comment on the choice of aspect ratio, but in general I don't think the type of film you're making should determine the format that you use. What it comes down to is how your mise-en-scène uses the aspect ratio that you chose. If an intimate drama works in scope that's not down to the subject matter, but how it's shot.

But since you did notice the aspect ratio immediately, this raises the question: did you think they used the width of the screen well or could they just have well shot it in 1.85?
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#4 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 04:50 AM

i certainly missed something but to me it could even had been shot in 1/66
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#5 Max Jacoby

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 05:18 AM

What did you think of the film as a whole?

I'll try to check it out in 2 weeks time.
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#6 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 06:19 AM

as whole it deserves the palm.
the mood is there the actresses are great they play it really soft and the subject is super heavy.
there is no speak when it's not needed.
it reminded a turkish movie "uzak" for the mood.

it's a masterpiece also because it looks verry simple but everything is at it's place
you'r not incomfortable watching it.

it's a verry good film, verry honnest it could be real life it's note a fake story
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#7 NathanCoombs

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 07:34 AM

it reminded a turkish movie "uzak" for the mood.


That is very encouraging. Looking forward to seeing it.
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#8 Max Jacoby

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 11:51 AM

I thought it was a good film. Not amazing but better than 90% of the stuff that gets shown in the cinema. I didn't mind the scope frame, I thought they used it well composition wise.

The film felt very honest, there were no music of editing/camera effects to manipulate you, yet it managed to create tension solely by the way it was directed (reducing cutting to a minimum, playing with offscreen, etc...) The performances were amazing.
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#9 Freya Black

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 12:31 PM

I haven't seen the film yet, so I can't comment on the choice of aspect ratio, but in general I don't think the type of film you're making should determine the format that you use. What it comes down to is how your mise-en-scène uses the aspect ratio that you chose. If an intimate drama works in scope that's not down to the subject matter, but how it's shot.


You can frame witin the frame of course and you can also use longer lenses in order to create a more claustraphobic feel.

Sometimes in horror films tho, vast empty desert or wasteland can give just as much a feeling of being trapped as tight confined places. Wide empty spaces, you can run as much as you want to but theres nowhere to hide! There is agrophobia as well as claustrophobia. Like running down endless corridors. Theres different ways of expressing theres nowhere to go!

The trouble is that acadamy is no longer really a projectable format so it becomes a choice of widescreen or scope and personally I always feel like 1.185:1 seems more likely to end up messed up in some way be it people making 4:3 videos from it or the masking being wrong somehow. This is probably mostly silly prejudice on my part but I just hate the thought of all my framing getting messed up.
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#10 John Holland

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 01:08 PM

Try to get hold of a movie called "The Ipcress File " directed by Sidney J Furie shot By Otto Heller mid 60's . Techniscope , spy film with Michael Caine [one of his best] dingy London locations , fantastic use of 2.35 , sometimes only 1/3 of screen is used ,ie out of focus forgrounds and props blocking screen its great , but you have to watch in the correct format .
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#11 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 22 September 2007 - 11:52 PM

You can frame witin the frame of course and you can also use longer lenses in order to create a more claustraphobic feel.

Sometimes in horror films tho, vast empty desert or wasteland can give just as much a feeling of being trapped as tight confined places. Wide empty spaces, you can run as much as you want to but theres nowhere to hide! There is agrophobia as well as claustrophobia. Like running down endless corridors. Theres different ways of expressing theres nowhere to go!


I think the most BRILLIANT example of this (though it was shot in VistaVision not in Cinemascope) was in North by Northwest when Cary Grant is attacked by the crop duster along that lonely crossroads (according to IMDB the same road James Dean died on) surrounded by corn fields and the amazing thing about that scene was I believe Hitchcock did it either on a bet or to prove a point that he could make the audience feel trapped in a wide open space. Part of my inspiration for Blood Moon Rising was that scene, the terror of being trapped in a vast open space. I wanted to combine that with the beauty and stunning dream/nightmare like quality Coppola and Vittorio Storaro created in Apocalypse Now.
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Aerial Filmworks

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Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

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